Posted on

Emily Morrow Home: Women in manufacturing are featured leaders at the Made in America Trade Show October 3-6th

We are BEYOND excited to be exhibiting with these amazing women-owned and led companies! I look forward to this week in Indianapolis. Be sure to check out the Emily Morrow Home Hardwood Floors in the Made In America LIVING ROOM and BEDROOM! Loominaries Handweaving​ Patricia Lukas, Holder Mattress Home Collection​ Lauren Taylor, Thomaston Mills​ Janet Wishnia. Individuals interested in attending the Made in America trade show can visit https://madeinamerica.com/event-attend/

Thank you!

image001.png

Women in manufacturing are featured leaders at the Made in America Trade Show, Jason Blount, 2019 Event Announcement, News 10/01/2019

First ever Made in America Trade show in Indianapolis, Oct 3rd to Oct 6th showcases consumer products Made in America. Features a Made in America Bedroom where all of the products are manufactured by women run businesses.

According to Consumer Reports, 8 out of 10 American consumers say they would rather buy an American-made product than an imported one. Entrepreneur Don Buckner became frustrated in 1998 when he attempted to find several American-made products online. That was the start of his journey which has culminated in his deciding to go all-in on the #AmericanMade plan.

His team searched for USA manufacturers, large and small, and established the first-ever Made in America Trade show. Come see a wide variety of American made products on display in Indianapolis running from Oct 3rd to Oct 6th

Did you know that more than 11.6 million firms are owned by women, employing nearly 9 million people, and generating $1.7 trillion in sales as of 2017? In fact, women run businesses are helping to lead a resurgence in American manufacturing. All of the firms chosen to display in the “All American Bedroom” are women run businesses.

The products, made by women lead companies, in the Made in America bedroom are as follows:

Bedding from https://americanblossomlinens.com

Mattresses from https://holdermattress.com/

Flooring from https://www.emilymorrowhome.com/

Rugs from www.loominaries.com

Emily Morrow Home

A woman-owned hardwood flooring company based in Dalton, Ga., Emily Morrow Home beautifully represents the American Dream. Although hardwood flooring has been a male-dominated industry that has sadly evolved into importing poorly made hardwood flooring, Emily Morrow Home is breaking the mold with quality, domestically-crafted products— and a commitment to doing things better…differently.

Like any good story, Emily Morrow Home began with a love story- a life-long love for design that grew into a profession. After almost 30-years of practicing interior design, 13 of which directing the design team for Shaw Floors, founder Emily Kiker Finkell entered a new chapter of life and launched the eponymous Emily Morrow Home. Included in Emily’s to-the-trade brand are beautifully designed collections of upscale hardwood flooring and luxury home décor, all proudly made in America.

From being inspired by the stunning vineyards of Napa Valley or the great wildebeest migration across Africa, each product within the Emily Morrow Home brand is designed to bring the world’s most stunning visuals home to her customers through local retailers. Emily Morrow sells through experienced small business flooring retailers across the nation, people with proven ability and craftsmanship Finkell donates a portion of proceeds to the Kiker Morrow Finkell Breast Cancer Foundation and participates in a prison work program that teaches inmates invaluable skills and work ethic.

For more inspiration and a more in-depth look into Finkell’s craft, visit her blog, https://www.emilymorrowhome.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-living-a-beautiful-life/, where you’ll find useful ideas and insights into home interior design as well as the simplest touches for adding joy to a day.

1-866-775-3877

American Blossom Linens

Thomaston Mills, a family owned textile mill, has been making bedding for over 115 years in the town of Thomaston, Georgia. While nearly all USA textile manufacturing and production moved overseas, decimating factories and jobs, Thomaston Mills continues to thrive and keeps manufacturing here in the USA. For the past 20 years, Thomaston manufacturing focused on the healthcare and hospitality market. Hilton, Marriott, Radisson and Intercontinental hotels have all used their sheets. Now they are offering a brand called American Blossom Linens direct to consumers.

In response to a massive rise in consumer demand for organic cotton and USA made products, Janet Wischnia, one of the owners of Thomaston Mills and granddaughter of the founder, decided to reenter the retail market in December 2018 with the launch of direct to consumer brand, American Blossom Linens. She brought back a brand, originally called Blossom that was created by Thomaston in the 1940’s with the goal of capturing the time tested quality of their origins. The collection, available now on the American Blossom Linens website, americanblossomlinens.com, includes sheet, pillowcase and duvet sets and a crib sheet. The linens are generously sized with extra deep pockets to provide an excellent fit on almost any height mattress. “Top or Bottom” labels act as visual cues to help you place the fitted sheet correctly on the mattress. Thomaston Mills wanted to make environmental responsibility easy, so they made the sheets more substantial, which helps them last longer and uses an advanced all-natural finishing process that softens the cotton to ensure a smooth feel.

American Blossom Linens bedding is made only in the USA using 100% traceable organic cotton grown in West Texas by family farmers. Their bedding is grown, processed, finished and sewn in the USA, drastically reducing its carbon footprint while supporting American workers all along the way. Thomaston Mills brought back American Blossom because they perceive people are looking for sustainable products, impeccably made in the USA by friends and neighbors, products that will last and last and never go out of style. American from the farm to the bed.

https://americanblossomlinens.com

888-825-0110 ext 2275

Holder Mattress

Since 1947, the Holder family has built a tradition of excellence by using the finest materials to construct their own mattresses and box springs. To this day, each set is still hand-crafted in their own factory in Kokomo, Indiana. All materials are carefully selected and sourced in the United States, meaning every Holder Mattress is not just made in Indiana but truly American Made. Attention to detail and craftsmanship and a standard of building a two-sided mattress or flippable mattress assures the Holder Mattress Factory standard of quality that has become notable throughout central Indiana.

In 2003, the granddaughter of the founder, Lauren McAshlan Taylor, assumed the reins as a third-generation owner. Lauren strives each day to build the quality of product her grandfather would have built himself, along with providing the highest level of customer service to her clients.

https://holdermattress.com/

1-800-879-9484

For as long as she can remember, Patricia has been intrigued by the art of weaving. Her first introduction to multi-harness looms was on a childhood visit to Sturbridge Village, a re-creation of an 18th century town in Sturbridge, Massachusetts. The gift Patricia received from her parents and husband upon her graduation from college was a four harness, 45” wide floor loom, which enabled her to create a greater variety of woven pieces. A magazine article about rag rugs shown to her by her mother sparked her interest and soon she began weaving her own rugs.

Patricia’s rugs began to catch the attention of interior designers, as well as home furnishing shops, and soon her business was transformed to the production of custom rag rugs which can be woven in any size up to twelve feet wide and any length. A move in November of 2015 to western North Carolina, surrounded by beautiful mountains and abundant wildlife, is the setting from which Patricia draws inspiration to create rugs which complement every style of home design.

Loominaires

www.loominaries.com

828-633-2187

The Made in America trade show runs from October 3rd thru 6th, more than 450,000 square feet of the Indiana Convention Center will be used to showcase hundreds of manufacturers including many small and women owned and run businesses who make products ranging from aerospace and automobiles to apparel and textiles. Organizers expect thousands of attendees. Events include a concert with country music duo Big and Rich, a talk by My Pillow founder Michael J. Lindell, a celebration honoring U.S. military veterans and “Made in America Awards” to recognize the accomplishments of American production heroes.

Individuals interested in attending the Made in America trade show can visit https://madeinamerica.com/event-attend/

 

Posted on

What does “MADE IN AMERICA” mean today?

Are you buying American?

 

Have you seen the news about an upcoming Made in America Exposition in Indianapolis, Indiana October 3rd through the 6th? Check it out! I think you might get as excited as I did when you see all the people and energy behind it. It might make your brain spin wondering “who” really is an All-American manufacturer. Proudly I’m exhibiting as the “Made in America Living Room” by Emily Morrow Home and showing the “Emily Morrow Home Hardwood Flooring” that is made in Tennessee by my husband’s company American OEM. Beyond the hardwood flooring we will be showing Aria Designs Upholstery that’s made in Lenoir, North Carolina, and hand-loomed rugs and pillows by artisan Patricia Lukas, owner of Loominaries of Candler, North Carolina. Just this afternoon, I had a call with another co-exhibitor at this MIA event who’s recently been stressing about the same challenges that I had: “Where do you find light bulbs or lamps that you can be certain are made in the USA? How pure can we actually remain with the various accessories that we place in our rooms at the expo? In regards to pillows, perhaps the fabric is made in the USA but the filler might be from overseas origins…where does the MIA intention begin and end? My intention is to stay within the practical realm when at all possible. The goal is to showcase all American-made products and to do our due diligence to make sure the hidden contents of the products are American as well.

 

Seeing through the fog

How hard is it to see through the fog of misleading messaging which products are and are not actually American-made? As an interior designer, a product designer, lifestyle brand and marketer, I have been tuned-in to this for many years. As an “insider” to the industry, you’d think it would be easier for me but it is very hard to know whose products are and whose are not American made. I can assure you that my hardwood flooring products are 100% American-made. Even our trees are responsibly grown and harvested from the eastern side of the USA and much of it comes from the great states of Indiana and Tennessee. It’s been said that “Southern Indiana grows the finest textured white oak timber in the world”. I don’t doubt that as our hardwood flooring is as beautiful as it is American.

Legal Logging

“French oak” or “Stolen Forests”

In the hardwood flooring category, there are hundreds of products that are veiled as “European” or “American” with luxuriously European or patriotic sounding names, with American flags on the graphics, playing on the “assumption” that this or that longstanding American brand / company/manufacturer’s products are made in the United States when in fact they’re not. Although I don’t have to like this, I do have to compete in this…and this world is not only highly competitive, it’s hard. The Decorative Hardwoods Association is a great resource if you’d like to read more about the subject of timber, legal and illegal.

You don’t have to compromise

We’ll be sharing more details about the design aesthetics of our Made In America EMILY MORROW HOME LIVING ROOM over the coming weeks. Meanwhile, I hope you’ll either plan to attend or follow the event, and more importantly won’t you consider doing business with American-made companies like my own Emily Morrow Home, or my amazing MIA friends: Holder Mattress Company, Wellborn Cabinets  and Loominaries ? You won’t have to compromise on style, quality or price and you might find that it will last longer, look better longer and one final thing is that you’ll have the sense of pride in the “American-made story” at the heart of your decisions. You can find our Emily Morrow Home Hardwood all across the USA as well as the Louis A. Dabbieri Hardwood Exclusively by Emily Morrow Home. Click this link to find our retailers near you and if you don’t find one, give me a call at 1-866-775-3877 and I’ll personally help you.

Check out our video library below featuring the design inspiration of our exquisite products, our OMG Proof Protection, Donatella the Truffle Dog and much more!

 

Enjoy your weekend!

Emily

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted on

Emily Finkell: A LIFE REIMAGINED: Chapter, Choices & Careers, Doing What You Love

NWFA Magazine’s 40 Under 40 December 2018 Issue

Collaboration, mentorship and remembering who opened doors for you are valuable life and work experiences that should compel you to pay it forward to those around you.
Photo courtesy of Emily Morrow Finkell.

While considering what to write for the “40 Under 40” issue of Hardwood Floors, I was reminded of some vital life lessons, ones that we all can learn at any age, and at any level of success. Typically, my articles focus on topics such as color, consumers, or design trends with titles like How to Use the Mega Trends or How to Design Your Interiors. This time, there’s a different insight I’d like to share, How to Design Your Life.

In my hometown of Dalton, Georgia, I am surrounded by some amazing success stories of industry icons. Known as the “Floor Covering Capital of the World,” Dalton is famous for entrepreneurial, hardworking, forward-thinking individuals. It’s also one of the most productive manufacturing areas in the U.S.; our hometown values emphasize “going to work and rolling up our sleeves,” according to the Greater Dalton Chamber of Commerce. There is an energy and a sense of community pride. Dalton is not unique in the number of individuals who are in their encore careers, but it is special because it’s the heart of the floor covering industry and our enterprises.

How many of you have wondered if your career path was the best direction? Or was your decision made out of necessity due to your circumstances? Regardless of your answer, my experience has taught me that each path you take always helps to build and prepare you for the next one. We all experience moments in our lives, either following graduation or a geographical move, when we accept a job where we don’t feel we are fully utilizing our skills, passions, or abilities, or the culture is not a good fit.

Look inward and think about your journey. Mine, for instance, began with a bachelor’s degree in Interior Design with a concentration in textiles. After I graduated in December 1989, job openings for college graduates were down 13.3 percent, and the job market had become one of the most competitive times since the early 1980s. Lucky me, right?

It’s true that necessity is the mother of invention, and so I took a job with a womenswear company in West Georgia, where I did everything from emptying the trash cans, to answering the phones, to assisting at sales meetings, to helping choose fabrics, patterns, and accessories for the collection. The owners, a husband and wife team, were the second generation of a menswear manufacturing business, and they gave me an opportunity at a time when I needed it most. I was and will always be grateful for that year because those experiences enriched my resume and expanded my skill set, even though that job had nothing to do with interior design.

Next, I took another opportunity with a retail furniture company that was expanding to Carrollton, Georgia, from their base in Rome, Georgia. They needed a professional interior designer on staff to organize their resource room of fabrics and finishes, to put together vignettes for their store, and to sell well-designed rooms to their customers who expected a white-glove experience. The store owners, another second generation family business, were well-versed in how to treat their customers with the highest level of attention. I have adopted this white-glove service mindset as part of my work ethic and infused it into my daily approach.

In year three, I was finally able to start my own interior design business, doing both commercial and residential projects. It was hard work, and I did it while being a mother to two young children. Life has a way of throwing us curves, and I found my children and myself back in my hometown of Dalton, Georgia, as a single mother with a heavy responsibility. After a few design projects were completed, I realized I needed something much more reliable. So I transitioned from an interior design business to the corporate world for the much-needed stability and benefits.

Enter Shaw and PatCraft. From the entry-level Associate Colorist to Senior Stylist, and eventually Director of Color Style & Design for Carpet and Hard Surface, I consider this the fourth chapter in my journey. It was in this chapter that I could finally look back and appreciate each of the previous steps. Every step allowed me opportunities for exposure to new things, professional and personal growth, as well as platforms from which to fine-tune my strengths and passions. After 13 years working at Shaw, I found myself at a very happy crossroads with some hard decisions to make. I ultimately decided to wrap things up with a neat bow and say my farewells to my Shaw family, with a wink that I might want to return someday, and retired early.

No one told me how much our identities and self-esteem are wrapped up in our profession. I didn’t expect to find myself longing for work, but after a few months off, I created a grand plan to make my personal life and my professional life come together in a way that dovetailed all of my strengths and passions with my husband’s. I formed a corporation, EF Floors & Design in September 2015, which quickly evolved into a brand, and thus Emily Morrow Home was born, aka my fifth chapter. I have loved every step of this chapter, even the hard ones. There have certainly been unseen challenges that have come along, but they’re also some of the most significant opportunities I’ve had to learn and grow.

The best part is that I’ve found myself looking around seeing others who are in the fifth, sixth, or even 10th chapters, later-in-life career changes or altogether new pathways. Some close friends have gone from respiratory therapists or accountants to interior design. Others have gone from stay-at-home moms to heading up large foundations and executives in corporations. You may have been noticing articles and news stories on “encore or second act careers;” they’re fascinating. AARP is one of my new favorite magazines (don’t knock it till you try it). Two of the best headlines they’ve featured are 70 Is the New 65 and New Rules of Retirement. They are worth pausing to read.

One that I’ve had on my desk for a week is titled Really Ready to Retire? by Jeri Sadler and Rick Miners, co-authors of Don’t Retire, Rewire! They compiled a list of seven things to consider before retiring, and these same questions apply to all of us at any age. Some of them include:

  • What ambitions are you waiting to fulfill?
  • What will make you rise each day as excited as you were at the high points of your career?
  • To what extent will you be in service to other family members once you retire?

So many young and “less young” professionals change careers and ask themselves if they’re making the right decision.

The good news is that we have generations of mentors surrounding us that we can look to for examples of how, in retrospect, each step is critical in building a career. Obviously, for those highlighted in the December/January issue of the magazine, you’re doing quite well and are to be commended for taking the initiative and learning all you can in your current chapter. If you are on the “Fabulous 40” list, you might consider taking on a mentoring role with someone less experienced or not as connected as you are as a way of paying it forward to those who have helped you. We all have so much to learn from one another; the 20 somethings can teach the 50 or 60 somethings a thing or two and vice versa.

I once had a handful of direct reports who were twice my age and possessed 10 times more experience than I did and yet each one of them was incredibly gracious and shared their knowledge when and where it was appropriate. Take some time to think of all those who walked before you to open a door, or worked shoulder to shoulder with you to teach and train you so that your journey was better. We should not only give them some credit, but we should also give ourselves some credit for having open minds, eyes, and ears to their wise counsel and example.

Emily Morrow Finkell is an interior designer and CEO of EF Floors & Design LLC in Dalton, Georgia, a provider of hardwood floors and home furnishings, and NWFA design contributor. She can be reached at emily@emilymorrowhome.com.

Featured Article in Atlanta Magazine November 2001 Issue
Dalton: Small Town, Big Business

 

Emily Morrow Featured in Atlanta Magazine November 2001 The Judd House owned by Evelyn Myers and the Myers Family.

Here are some compelling reports on the subject of careers and choices of work, income, culture and priorities:

Forbes: Job-Hopping Millennials Offer Benefits to Employers While Being “Selfish”

Job-hopping is in, and being stuck in a dead-end job is on its way out — and that’s good for everyone. Job-hopping millennials are more likely to earn a higher wage, develop their career on a faster track and find a better fit in work culture by changing jobs more frequently. The stigma is lessening as the positives are revealed. One CareerBuilder survey shared employers expect 45% of their newly hired college grads would remain with the company for under two years, and the study showed that by age 35, about 25% of young employees would have worked five jobs. Employers are aware they’re hiring job-hoppers as millennials find their footing in their career development, learning to make healthy choices rather than staying stuck and unmotivated in a job that’s not beneficial for either the employee or employer.

Generation X — not millennials — is changing the nature of work

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/04/11/generation-x–not-millennials–is-changing-the-nature-of-work.html

Demonstrating loyalty, a willingness to take on a heavy workload, and a powerful combination of digital and traditional leadership skills, Gen X is producing highly capable leaders that are in danger of being overlooked. Organizations that want to retain and develop their Gen X leaders should:

– Provide leaders with more external guidance. While Gen X leaders are loyal, they are craving insight and knowledge from mentors outside of their organization. In fact, 67 percent of leaders said that they would like more external coaching, and 57 percent wanted external development. Employers should invest in helping Gen X leaders participate in outside professional organizations, industry conferences and other groups to foster relationships with external peers and mentors who can provide coaching.

– Encourage leaders to challenge the status quo. Many organizations may look to millennials to lead innovative projects, particularly those that are tech-based. But Gen X leaders are likely to thrive when given the opportunity to experiment with new approaches and challenge existing methods. Ideally, a cross-generational team — perhaps led by a Gen Xer — may deliver the most innovative solutions.

– Leverage technology to support traditional development. Like those in other generations, Gen X leaders said they still want traditional learning methods, such as formal workshops, training courses and seminars. However, they also enjoy the personalization and convenience offered by technology-based tools. Blending traditional learning methods with tech-enabled tools to enhance and solidify learning will help them make the most of their development opportunities.

The oldest Gen X workers will likely still be in the workforce for at least 10 years, and the younger members of the generation may still be working for more than 30, meaning that Gen X will be forming the backbone of organizations’ leadership for quite some time. Those that overlook Gen X in favor of focusing only on the youngest generations entering the workforce will miss out on a deep and valuable source of leadership potential.

Now is the time to focus on strengthening the skills of Gen X and further developing their broad range of skills.

 

So many times colleagues have an opportunity to let others talents shine, and along the way we learn what makes these people “leaders” and “mentors” even when they might not have the “title” to accompany their leadership. Being able to share our color and design inspiration allowed my team the ability and opportunity to grow in ways we couldn’t have imagined.

 

Never underestimate the power of sending a handwritten note…I’ve kept so many notes sent from friends over the years and they serve as a reminder to never be too busy to pause and recognize a friend’s or colleagues (or competitor’s) accomplishments.

 

‘No Man is an Island’

No man is an island entire of itself; every man 

is a piece of the continent, a part of the main; 

if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe 

is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as 

well as any manner of thy friends or of thine 

own were; any man’s death diminishes me, 

because I am involved in mankind. 

And therefore never send to know for whom 

the bell tolls; it tolls for thee. 

MEDITATION XVII

Devotions upon Emergent Occasions

John Donne

Posted on

A trip to Africa inspires EMH 2019 by FCW Morgan Bulman

A Trip to Africa Inspires EMH 2019 Products…Originally Published in Floor Covering Weekly on Wednesday, November 14, 2018


Storyboards are essential to the design process and help Emily Morrow Finkell transform inspirations into products.

They heard it before they saw it. For several days, Emily Morrow Finkell, CEO of Emily Morrow Home, waited to witness the “Masai Mara,” a migration of nearly two million wildebeest across Africa in search of greener plains and savannas. On the second to last day of her trip to Kenya this past August, while perched atop a safari jeep with husband Don Finkell, CEO of American OEM, cameras and scopes zoomed in, Morrow Finkell saw movement across a nearby river. They felt the wildebeest hooves echo like a rumble of thunder as they took off in a blur of color — a moment that would later serve as the chief source of inspiration behind Emily Morrow Home’s 2019 hardwood collection. For a short video clip of this experience, click this link “Emily Morrow Home’s Design Journey“.

“You can see the dust, the wildebeest, the zebras and other smaller animals all getting caught up in the herd as they’re migrating. They’re giving birth, they’re dying, there’s this whole circle of life story that was the biggest key for my products,” recalled Morrow Finkell. “Our products are natural and when you bring them into your home, you’re living on them, you’re experiencing important chapters of life with them. And they’ll last, they’ll be there for it all.” 

Dalton, GA: The Emily Morrow Home collection for 2019 is twelve-SKU range of cooler browns and warmer grays, drawn from scenes Emily Morrow Finkell, CEO, observed of lion fur, zebra manes and the hides of rhinos, elephants and, of course, wildebeests. But her recent visit to Kenya isn’t the only story — a mixture of other memories and travels also appear in the upcoming collection.

For example, Paddock, a gray brown with subtle shading, ushers in sights from the Kentucky Derby. And, similar to that, Justify is a warm brown that mimics the Triple Crown-winning racehorse it’s titled after.

“The one thing I can’t not be is personal. Even when we have had designers and architects help with the inspiration, providing so much input into the products, colors or finishes, we work together on the naming process,” Morrow Finkell told FCW during a visit to Dalton. “There’s a reason behind why we do it. I think everyone likes to have a connection to a name. It makes it more memorable and we can immediately call to mind with our imagination the reasoning of the names.”

Each SKU is different, whether it comes down to an oil-rubbed look, a super dry low gloss, an ultra-micro bevel or a white plaster imitation. Yet despite the variability, there’s still some flexibility with the possibility of further customization.

“We find ourselves collaborating with a number of groups, such as for luxury high-rises, when there are times a project calls for something more unique or special to best fit that space,” said Morrow Finkell. “Everything is semi-customizable and we’re going to take that to the next level. That’s not to say that people won’t find exactly what they want with our original creations, but if our customers feel they need to make something more custom, we do have that design flexibility.”

One aspect that is the same across the collection is the addition of MorCore, which will give the floors an enhanced 3.55 mm wearlayer. The thicker platform, Morrow Finkell mentioned, is in response to designers asking for a little bit more when it came to the wearlayer, which is previously 2.5 mm thick. Both, however, also come with a “Donatella the Truffle Dog” scratch resistance.

New to the collection is the upgraded MorCore, which features a sturdy 3.5 mm wearlayer.



For Morrow Finkell, the collection now has even more to love. With a greater durability, an increased width and length, and a higher impact resistance, Emily Morrow Home wood flooring can be used for both residential and commercial undertakings. In fact, the new white oak option in taupe, which features a smooth surface and is seven inches wide, is currently being installed with Apex Wood Floors for a commercial project to elevate a luxury appliance showroom in Chicago.

“Because our products are so incredibly well-made and constructed — all the way down to the wearlayer, warranty and finishes — they can go across all categories with no issues or hesitations at all,” explained Morrow Finkell.

Morrow Finkell also suspects there will be a few winners in the new collection of twelve, but she’s excited to see the market’s real response. For her, it’s about creating something fresh, but not something so new that people can’t embrace it and put it in their own homes.

Currently, advance previews of the collection are being shared with select customers across the U.S., but is set to be fully unveiled at the Carpet One winter convention in early January with Emily Morrow Home as a vendor to CCA Global Partners, then at TISE later that month and Domotex USA in February. The collection announcements will also include EMH’s 2019 Color of the Year.

 

The 2019 hardwood collection from Emily Morrow Home will feature a product inspired by the company’s 2018 color of the year, a matte black, called Total Eclipse.