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Hardwood floors for puppies

Welcome to the end of the tunnel

Doge’ Palace in Venice, Italy is not a palace for Dogs…Is your home dog-friendly?

 

Welcome to the end of the tunnel, the place where we kept seeing the light, but never quite reaching it. We are there now and it’s the best feeling to bask in the warmth of the light and be thankful for having made it. While you’re basking in the warmth of the light, let me ask you a question or two. Did you move or stay in your existing home? If so, did you build a new home? Did you adopt a pet this past year? If so, what did you get, dog or cat? What prompted you to get this pet? Now that our states are opening back up, do you plan to go back to work-life as you once practiced it, traveling every week, going to shows across the globe, meeting with other business people in person rather than virtually? I can only speak for my family and myself, we are traveling significantly less, corresponding with customers virtually more times than not and (drum roll please)…we brought home a new puppy. We had already been on a waiting list for two years and so the timing seemed just right when we heard that a litter of puppies had been born and one would be available to us. Our first dog Donatella (#Donatellathetruffledog) is six years old, (wouldn’t she like a new little sister?) and we decided on the name for our new puppy, “Baci” (the Italian word for kisses). We had visions of cuddling with the furry little thing and imagined it couldn’t be too hard to go from one dog to two dogs (LOL). Across Dalton, my sister and her family have adopted several baby goats, peacocks, ducks, donkeys and chickens, all of which is ideal since they live on our family’s farm and have the space. In our own neighborhood we have been noticing some new things any time we go for a walk. Besides the few new homes under construction, we also noticed several homes get new roofs, and smaller additions like fire pits, outdoor kitchens, raised beds and fences being built for those who now have time to garden or get a new dog. It seems we all discovered extra time on our hands and wanted to add more of “nature” to enhance lifestyle and improve our health. In making this transition to having a more “nature-inspired” and harmonious lifestyle, we are adjusting our interior finishes…considering moving a velvet sofa or an oushak rug into a less-often used room, then you’re in good company. Are you looking at the color of your dog’s hair (on your pants) and wondering to yourself “what color of flooring would disguise the daily dog hair I’m cleaning up?”…then you’re thinking like a designer thinks, looking at how we live in a new light. We are universally feeling the desire to expand our walls of our home to the great outdoors. Transitioning to more time living outdoors does require planning. Are your floors protected just inside your doorway? What are you stepping onto as you go outside? Do the colors and finishes inside and out “harmonize” aesthetically? Is that important? Yes, of course! If not, you’ll not find yourself drawn to the space, you’ll not feel compelled to invite your family and friends to join you outside unless it is pleasing to you. Pro tips: add a great “scrubby” walk-off mat outside your door way; kick off your shoes inside your door; and look at where the sunlight is coming in through the windows and move around rugs or furniture so your floors don’t get a “tan line”.

 

My little visitor one day at EMILY MORROW HOME was the GOAT of all goats.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Going beyond “Milled Naturals” Color Family of the Year, several mega-trends have emerged that will help explain why so many people are asking for performance hardwood flooring (and other types) that looks “natural” not “plastic”. Slow living has taken precedences and the element of “time” and sharing it with others offers us rejuvenating solace. Imagine finding a place to enjoy hot tea with a cozy blanket that says “I’ve got you covered”, let’s take the time to enjoy what has always been in front of us, with new-found profound appreciation. The cozy, calm, and comfort of things like being at home, surrounded with soft fibers, natural materials, sueded and velvet textures help soothe the senses. Things like healthy living, values like “real wood” and “natural materials” influence us viscerally, without thought. Why this matters is that it guides homeowners decisions and choices for what they bring into their lives. Recent reports from NAHB indicate that new home construction is slowing due to increasing material costs and slowly rising interest rates. (See more housing economics data on nahb.org)

 

Performance features for hardwood flooring has included the scratch-resistance since its introduction a few decades ago. Even today, after all these years, people really are amazed when they see the difference between hardwood with scratch-resistance and hardwood without it. Test it for yourself (videos provided in the highlighted links). Simply get a green abrasive cleaning pad and rub it vigorously on two samples of hardwood, noting which one is which. Immediately you’ll see how easy it is to get right past the finish if it isn’t scratch resistant and just imagine how quickly it would “ugly” out in an entire interior of unprotected flooring. Today we now have many manufacturers who are making performance hardwood flooring that really do resist water, spills, scratches and scuffs, and it’s affordable. The feedback I hear is that most people cannot tell the difference between samples unless you hold a sample up to the light and maybe then there’s a very slight difference. The fact that it doesn’t scratch, scuff, warp or swell far outweighs the nearly indiscernible visual difference, makes “our new normal”, “life as we know it” easier and more enjoyable.

Baci, our newest addition to the family

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what happened with this new fur baby, Baci? First of all, we have worked our way through many rolls of paper towels, sanitizing wipes to clean up her little “OMG” accidents just inside the door, under the sofa, as well as the pantry. Only part of our home has the hardwood floors that we manufacture since the majority of square footage was already done in a lovely pine (previous homeowner) which we loved when we moved in. What has happened since is not a pretty sight. In some of the areas where both dogs have a habit of relieving themselves, the finish of the pine is delaminating badly. It should be the picture next to the definition of the term in the handbook of hardwood terminology. Additionally, there are several claw marks where Donatella skidded across the soft wood of the pine floors (she is only twenty six pounds). I wish daily for our own OMG Proof Protected hardwood floors to magically appear throughout the entire house, but in the meantime it’s fodder for my blog and articles. Our puppy Baci is now five months old and she is not 100% potty trained yet, but based on the amount of training treats we’ve bought and used, we must be getting close. My point in all this sharing of personal experience is this, hardwood flooring that is made with performance protection really does make life easier for the end-users, residentially and commercially.

Cheers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MILLED NATURALS – EMH COLOR FAMILY OF 2021

EMILY MORROW HOME RELEASES The ENTIRE 2021 COLOR FAMILY OF THE YEAR and our hardwood flooring styles which fall into the color families. 

ENJOY OUR NEWEST VIDEO SHOWCASING  ALL OF THE NINE COLORS

 

MILLED NATURALS COLOR FAMILY AND OUR HARDWOOD FLOORING THAT BEST EXEMPLIFIES THESE STUNNING VISUALS!

Dalton, GA, FEBRUARY 11, 2021 – Emily Morrow Finkell, founder and CEO of Emily Morrow Home, is pleased to announce the release of the 2021 Color Family of the Year, MILLED NATURALS.

Please find below our press release outlining the color stories behind the 2021 Color of the Year, also the supporting images and linked here is the EMH Milled Naturals Video which tells the story in a little more than one minute. 
Because great design does not cease during a pandemic, our “travel” to research the market trends has been ongoing. 
We hope you enjoy our color story and if you have an interest in learning more  about our “GOAT-inspired” Color family, we’d love to share it!

 

 

 

 

Gold’s warming influence sets the stage for a brown-based color story

Dalton, GA – February 12, 2021 – Color is Relational. For COTY 2021, Emily Morrow Home sees a bigger picture of how color reflects a Healthy living lifestyle… one of being “At home” with family. We are all on the journey of change…yearning for comfort and community. This sense of community influenced us to choose a different path for the Color of the Year 2021. Rather than highlighting 1 color, EMH to choose to highlight a Color Family…of 9!

Introducing the EMH 2021 Color Family of the YearMilled Naturals

Milled Naturals is a universal, must-have color family that emits an elevated level of luxurious tones for 2021.Gold’s warming influence gives this color family a seasonless and timeless appeal. When paired with each other, all 9 colors in the Milled Naturals family work together, harmoniously. They are also quietly confident when standing on their own. The lighter, luxurious Milled Naturals have a graceful subtlety that is tranquil and soothing.

This family has strong roots of yellow and red that provide balance to the more saturated Milled Naturals. This brown-based story has long-lasting relevance and is a fresh new direction from the market saturated grey influence of recent years. Like freshly tilled earth from which nature springs, Good Earth is the first color in our color family, followed by the ever-nurturing Goat’s Milk. Good Earth is best represented by two deep brown hardwood styles, William & Mary and Handmade Harvest. Goat’s Milk can be found in our Cosmopolitan Coast and Surf Shack.

We believe that when you experience the warmth of the Milled Naturals, they will influence a conversation of grounding words, ripe for our life-stretching moments.

EMH BUZZ WORDS:

Universal | Seasonless | Authentic | Flexible | Artisanal | Heirloom | Legacy

Tranquil | Community | Regenerate | Cocoon | Comfort | Tactile |Confident

Expect our natural hardwood flooring to show its natural beauty… listening to its inherent design and texture that nature calls us to appreciate.

By adding bold, organic accent colors, the pairing of Milled Naturals offers endless color combinations that have universal application. Refresh with vibrant trending Greens, powdered and chalked tints, rich jewel tones, and orange- based color combinations.

As we continue to search for support, comfort, trust, and interactive touch, the time has come for the universal warmth of the 2021 EMH Milled Naturals color family.

Stay tuned, monthly, for more in-depth stories of each of the 9 EMH 2021 Milled Naturals to be released throughout the year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My sister’s baby goat visited my offices and I was smitten…to the point of shifting our color story to GOAT’S MILK.

About Emily Morrow Home

Emily Morrow Home is a leader in the American hardwood flooring industry. Founded by Emily Morrow Finkell, the company offers high-quality, luxury hardwoods to retailers through select distributors and buying groups. All flooring products are sustainably harvested, constructed, and finished in the USA. Finkell is a member of the NWFA (National Wood Flooring Association); NWFA Verified from U.S. Renewing Forests; California Environmental Protection Agency Air Resources Board; Allied Member ASID; CMG; and SCS Certified Indoor Advantage Gold For more information, visit emilymorrowhome.com or Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube or Vimeo.

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In memory of Evelyn Myers | WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS 

February 22, 2021 —Honoring the memory and legacy of Evelyn Myers

If you aren’t from our part of the country (Dalton, Ga) I’ll let you in on a little secret… we are surrounded by some very strong and smart women. Case in point is Evelyn Myers, who co-founded Myers Flooring in 1957 with her husband Gene Myers. Myers Flooring grew over the years with stores in Atlanta, Nashville as well as the first one in Dalton. Myers has always had that extra something that feels stylish, classy and a cut above. This was somewhat radical when compared to the stereotypical carpet retailers of the 1960’s-1970’s. Myers was known for going the extra mile in marketing by staging live photo shoots inside real home interiors (lovely homes) in order to show floor covering in the most aspirational light. To this day, Mrs. Myers and the influence of her sons Rick and Ray is ever-present. Anytime you walk into one of the three Myers locations, you’ll know and feel you are in very capable hands, and if you walk into the Nashville store, you will see it personified in the form of third generation Sinclair Myers.  My interaction with Mrs. Myers was unique in that we would run into each other from time to time in Dalton or Chattanooga, and she would ask me about my interior design business, asking if I was ever moving back to Dalton, et cetera. If you’ve ever been in the presence of someone whose smile radiates light and warmth, then you’d know what it felt like for me as a young interior designer, Mrs. Myers had that gift and made me feel special.

Prior to the opening of the Judd House, I asked for a special favor, and that was to be able to use the frame picture of Evelyn Myers (elegantly perched on the wing of an airplane) in one the of rooms I’d designed in the “upstairs guest bedroom”. Everyone who entered would go immediately to the framed portrait and remark at how beautiful she was…and she truly was beautiful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gene Myers, with the help of his wife Evelyn, and later sons Rick and Ray, opened Dalton’s first carpet store

As quoted at Myers Carpet About Us: The company was founded in 1957 by Gene Myers, who started buying scraps of carpet from local mills and reworking them into stair treads and small rugs which he then sold through area chenille stores on “Peacock Alley” on Georgia Highway 41. Gene Myers, with the help of his wife Evelyn, and later sons Rick and Ray, opened Dalton’s first carpet store and began offering carpet from Dalton’s local mills. Patcraft was first. Later, Art Black, founder of Evans and Black Carpet of Arlington, Texas, gave Myers his first line. Gene Myers passed away in 1981 at age 53 and the company was then managed by sons, Rick and Ray Myers. In 1987, Myers Carpet opened a 3000 square-foot showroom on Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia. Six years later they purchased and moved into a 35,000 square-foot showroom and warehouse at 1500 Northside Drive. That location quickly became the flagship store for Myers. In 1998, Myers Flooring was opened in Nashville, Tennessee, followed by the purchase in 2001 of the showroom and warehouse of Division Street Carpets at 641 Division Street in downtown Nashville. Myers Flooring of Nashville then purchased the assets of Van Gilmore’s Nashville Carpet Center in 2016 and combined the two businesses and employees at our current location at 2919 Sidco Drive in Nashville.

“Myers Carpet Company was the first and remains the oldest carpet store in Dalton, Georgia, “The Carpet Capital of the World.

Below is an article about “women inspiring others” in National Wood Flooring Association’s Hardwood Floors Magazine | WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS

Emily Morrow Featured in Atlanta Magazine November 2001 The Judd House owned by Evelyn Myers and the Myers Family.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As I look back on my career path, I am grateful to the incredible women who so generously opened doors and encouraged me to go further and do do better. One such women was Evelyn Myers. In 2001 I had moved back to my hometown of Dalton from Carrollton, Georgia where I’d practiced interior design for 12 years. Although I was known in Dalton as Emily Kiker, I was not known by most as Emily Morrow, the interior designer. I did however know Mrs. Myers through my own mother and in some of our exchanges, she shared some of her upcoming “design-related” endeavors. It was that same year, 2001, Evelyn Myers invited me to be a guest designer in her “Judd House Designer Showhouse”, which would provide valuable networking opportunities with our local community, other designers and architects. If not for her invitation, I might not have had the change to meet the many contacts who later became my colleagues and bosses at Shaw Industries.

The February March 2020 issue of Hardwood Floors celebrates the talented and dynamic women in our industry who have gone before us and worked amongst us. They smoothed the path, opened doors, and showed other women the way forward. I am so inspired by these women and would not be where I am today without their wisdom and guidance. Looking back on the lessons I’ve learned, and taking stock of how many influential and passionate women have inspired me never to stop growing, I hope what I do today will inspire others in the same way. While my career has gone through a series of changes, I know my journey would not have been possible with the support given to me by women in the industry.

THE VITAL ROLE OF WOMEN IN FLOOR COVERING

I’m fortunate to have a unique perspective on the power of women in flooring history, starting at a very early age. Growing up in Dalton, Georgia, I’ve witnessed generation after generation of women entrepreneurs acting as trailblazers and role models. If you’re familiar with the history of carpet, you’ll know it all started in Dalton along “Peacock Alley” with the crafting of hand-tufted chenille bedspreads, an industry started by extraordinary women like Dicksie Bradley Bandy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During the great depression, Dicksie and her husband’s country store had given credit to their customers who had no money to pay for the goods they needed, only their possessions, what they could make or grow themselves. The country store eventually became indebted to their suppliers and although there was no way to recoup the money from their customers, Dicksie and her husband were determined to repay every dollar. Determined to find a way to raise the funds, she boarded a train to Washington, D.C., carrying a suitcase filled with hand-tufted chenille bedspreads to sell to large department stores. She came home with enough money to repay her suppliers AND with enough orders to give several families an income for their craft. That simple cottage industry grew and evolved to the point where Dalton is now known not just the “carpet capital” but as the “floor covering capital of the world”. 

In this industry, not only are many of my peers women, but the majority of our customers are as well. We speak of “Ms. Consumer” as making more than 91% of the purchasing decisions for the home. With the purchasing power of women in the United States ranging from $5 trillion annually, we certainly MUST consider “her” in our business decisions, and we certainly MUST consult women on what goes into a new product launch. 

LESSONS IN RESILIENCE AND PAYING DUES

Looking back, some of my early jobs were excruciating. One example was working for a family-owned women’s wear manufacturer whose owners would inadvertently exhale their cigarette smoke into my eyes causing me to leave work many days in tears. At the same time, they also gave me the chance to work with fabrics, color-ways, and the people that would be selling the apparel across the U.S. That experience was priceless. Soon I found myself training sales persons about the designs and colors of the coming collections.

Along the way, I learned about perseverance, resilience and the importance of hard work – even when it it seemed at the time like I was being pulled in the wrong direction. Balancing competing priorities had been modeled by my mother, a fantastic entrepreneur in her own right. As I began my own journey into motherhood as an interior designer, I carried with me the power of the examples and lessons that only magnified in importance over time. 

While I loved the work I was doing, after the arrival of my firstborn William, I was inspired to take a huge leap. The result was that my own interior design business was born. It was the culmination of all that I had learned and experienced up until then – and just when I thought I had it all “balanced” along comes Mary. Juggling motherhood to two small children with an interior design business taught me how to put first things first. My first design business operated in the West Georgia area for nearly 12 years, doing both commercial and residential design projects. 

Those years allowed me the experience of putting family first. It’s a lesson I’ve tried to live by since. I learned to be a mother first and foremost, and I had the flexibility and freedom to schedule design appointments around the schedules of babysitters, mothers’ mornings out, and my children’s own evolving schedules. 

ANSWERING THE OPPORTUNITY

The women in my life have taught me so many powerful lessons that I try to pass on to those who I have had the good fortune of knowing. One of the most important things I was taught is that like doors, opportunities can open and close quickly. Recognizing the opportunities requires a certain kind of “sixth sense” to know when to take them. Unfortunately, too often opportunities can seem daunting and present themselves as “risk”.

This lesson became a huge blessing as I faced a professional crossroads in 2002. Having just become a single mother, and after operating my own interior design business for many years, I was encouraged to move into the corporate world to provide the benefits my children and I would need. While there was some risk involved (would I be able to work the corporate hours? What if my kids needed me? How could I juggle my children’s activities with my travel schedule?…and much more) it was a leap that I was well-prepared to take for my family. 

So when asked if I could direct a large group of corporate professionals and juggle continually changing business priorities, I actually laughed out loud. That had become second nature to me. For years, at any given time, I had teams of painters, carpenters, flooring installers or other tradespeople going in and out of the businesses and homes of my clients, on time and budget, all while being a mother of two. Speaking of juggling priorities, one very important project, a medical arts building was being installed the very day I was in labor with the birth of my daughter. Needless to say, both “projects” demanded my attention that day but in the end, my family was only thing that truly mattered.

THE IMPORTANCE OF FAMILY

I hope that my experience demonstrates to other women – and men – in the industry that you can prioritize family and still have an enriching and successful career. That is perhaps the most important lesson of all, and one I hope to be remembered for, the same way I remember all of the incredible wisdom and support that was shared with me.

I encourage all of us to prioritize family and to allow everything else to fall into place. Following my own advice, I opted to leave a life of constant travel while working for a massive company, to instead revel in family. I chose to instead take a moment to savor my time being a new wife, a mother, and an empty nester.

When the time was right, I again took another risk, following my instinct, and formed a new enterprise, one that would eventually become relevant to husband’s own company. Who encouraged me to take that step? It was the same woman who inspired me nearly thirty years prior, my mother.

 

 

 

 

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MILLED NATURALS – EMH COLOR FAMILY OF 2021

EMILY MORROW HOME RELEASES The 2021 COLOR FAMILY OF THE YEAR and our hardwood flooring styles which fall into the color families. 

Dalton, GA, FEBRUARY 11, 2021 – Emily Morrow Finkell, founder and CEO of Emily Morrow Home, is pleased to announce the release of the 2021 Color Family of the Year, MILLED NATURALS.

Please find below our press release outlining the color stories behind the 2021 Color of the Year, also the supporting images and linked here is the EMH Milled Naturals Video which tells the story in less than a minute. 
Because great design does not cease during a pandemic, our “travel” to research the market trends has been ongoing. 
We hope you enjoy our color story and if you have an interest in learning more  about our “GOAT-inspired” Color family, we’d love to share it!

 

 

 

 

Gold’s warming influence sets the stage for a brown-based color story

Dalton, GA – February 12, 2021 – Color is Relational. For COTY 2021, Emily Morrow Home sees a bigger picture of how color reflects a Healthy living lifestyle… one of being “At home” with family. We are all on the journey of change…yearning for comfort and community. This sense of community influenced us to choose a different path for the Color of the Year 2021. Rather than highlighting 1 color, EMH to choose to highlight a Color Family…of 9!

Introducing the EMH 2021 Color Family of the YearMilled Naturals

Milled Naturals is a universal, must-have color family that emits an elevated level of luxurious tones for 2021.Gold’s warming influence gives this color family a seasonless and timeless appeal. When paired with each other, all 9 colors in the Milled Naturals family work together, harmoniously. They are also quietly confident when standing on their own. The lighter, luxurious Milled Naturals have a graceful subtlety that is tranquil and soothing.

This family has strong roots of yellow and red that provide balance to the more saturated Milled Naturals. This brown-based story has long-lasting relevance and is a fresh new direction from the market saturated grey influence of recent years. Like freshly tilled earth from which nature springs, Good Earth is the first color in our color family, followed by the ever-nurturing Goat’s Milk. Good Earth is best represented by two deep brown hardwood styles, William & Mary and Handmade Harvest. Goat’s Milk can be found in our Cosmopolitan Coast and Surf Shack.

We believe that when you experience the warmth of the Milled Naturals, they will influence a conversation of grounding words, ripe for our life-stretching moments.

EMH BUZZ WORDS:

Universal | Seasonless | Authentic | Flexible | Artisanal | Heirloom | Legacy

Tranquil | Community | Regenerate | Cocoon | Comfort | Tactile |Confident

Expect our natural hardwood flooring to show its natural beauty… listening to its inherent design and texture that nature calls us to appreciate.

By adding bold, organic accent colors, the pairing of Milled Naturals offers endless color combinations that have universal application. Refresh with vibrant trending Greens, powdered and chalked tints, rich jewel tones, and orange- based color combinations.

As we continue to search for support, comfort, trust, and interactive touch, the time has come for the universal warmth of the 2021 EMH Milled Naturals color family.

Stay tuned, monthly, for more in-depth stories of each of the 9 EMH 2021 Milled Naturals to be released throughout the year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My sister’s baby goat visited my offices and I was smitten…to the point of shifting our color story to GOAT’S MILK.

About Emily Morrow Home

Emily Morrow Home is a leader in the American hardwood flooring industry. Founded by Emily Morrow Finkell, the company offers high-quality, luxury hardwoods to retailers through select distributors and buying groups. All flooring products are sustainably harvested, constructed, and finished in the USA. Finkell is a member of the NWFA (National Wood Flooring Association); NWFA Verified from U.S. Renewing Forests; California Environmental Protection Agency Air Resources Board; Allied Member ASID; CMG; and SCS Certified Indoor Advantage Gold For more information, visit emilymorrowhome.com or Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube or Vimeo.

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Reclaimed? Repurposed? Or New? Flooring Trends for 2021

Making the Move By, EMILY MORROW FINKELL

PUBLISHED BY NWFA HARDWOOD FLOORS MAGAZINE ON FEBRUARY 1, 2021

Consumers seek furnishings and flooring with character

 

Emily Morrow Home eases into every interior with timeless style

COVID-19 has changed the way people live. For example, last year, we witnessed a massive exodus from cities like New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles to suburban areas. From February 2020 through July 2020, a study by MYMOVE found that the number of people moving in the United States was a staggering 16 million. While you might think these were “temporary” moves, more than 14 million have made their change a permanent one. Being able to work, shop, and go to school online has opened the door for these shifts.Image

Along with the movement of people coincides the movement of their possessions. Storage units in many cities are actually at full capacity. Considering the actual “shelter” differences from metropolitan to suburban, it is natural that we are seeing a shift in furnishings. Visualize “vintage” rather than “used” furnishings.

As people move, they are leaving old items at consignment shops to sell. Behind them comes someone who reclaims these furnishings, which have the added bonus of not requiring a long order fulfillment time. Today, both moves and supply chain delays for furnishings are driving this “reclaimed” trend. With people spending more of their days at home, they are also finding time and motivation to touch up, paint, or refinish the furnishings. Now, just imagine what kinds of flooring people are seeking to match their new “vintage” furnishings.

Beyond the movement from the city to the country, there also has been an uptick in families that are building second homes. Some are being built in rural areas because the family wants a place to unplug, and be able to walk about their own property without masks and hand sanitizer. These consumers now seek furnishings and flooring with “character.” Some of which is reclaimed.

 

 

Photo courtesy of an Emily Morrow Home customer

 

One project that I can speak about is a century-old family barn renovation, which, when finished, will be a second home. It is designed to be a place for their entire family to gather together with the focus being on durability, low maintenance, and warmth. The owners reached out to me to discuss which flooring would look best from a design perspective.

While true reclaimed flooring offers a fantastic visual and an amazing story that is unlike any other, it could come with challenges such as a higher price tag and the potential of being limited in supply. For this particular project, the client decided they wanted engineered hardwood that comes with a warranty, could be installed on a slab and in a basement, was factory finished, and offered a wide and controlled range of visuals.

Within this article, you will see a few photos of Candace’s family barn in Kansas, which recently turned 100 years old. When it came to selecting the hardwood flooring, Candace also was taking into consideration having enough contrast with the bright white paint of the interior barn walls, and what would tie in best with the stairs as well as the kitchen cabinets she had painted “Hale Navy.”

Candace had stumbled across one of my blog posts that said “if you need a little hand-holding in making your decisions about your design or flooring, email askemily@emilymorrowhome.com.” She contacted me, and what resulted was a lively virtual design consultation. In the end, her final two favorite styles were “Suddenly Sonoma” and “Authentic Luxury,” each having hand-crafted distressing and dimension, and each offering a unique look. She couldn’t decide between the two, and ultimately decided to go with both options by using Authentic Luxury for the upstairs levels and Suddenly Sonoma for downstairs.

As I write this, the flooring was not yet installed, but these images give you an idea of the colors and layout of this antique property, as well as the samples they considered throughout the home. If not for the ability to utilize technology and to mail samples, it’s certain that her process would have been more difficult and drawn out. With technology, not only was she able to get the design and hardwood flooring expertise she needed, she also was able to check on the status of her order via texting and keep her installer looped in on her approximate delivery date for the flooring.

SUDDENLY SONOMA, BY EMILY MORROW HOME

 

Hearing firsthand Candace’s desires drives home the fact that consumers are hungry to bring a rustic calmness into their living spaces. Thankfully, options to bring this feeling into homes is easier to introduce than ever before. By combining reclaimed furnishings, reclaimed wood flooring, or engineered hardwood flooring that deliberately exudes rustic warmth and character, more and more consumers are taking control of their living spaces and infusing natural beauty into their lives.

Emily Morrow Finkell is an interior designer and CEO of EF Floors & Design LLC in Dalton, Georgia, a provider of hardwood floors and home furnishings, and an NWFA design contributor. She can be reached at emily@emilymorrowhome.com.

 

 

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A Custom Connection | Luxury Hardwood Flooring

BY EMILY MORROW FINKELL AND PUBLISHED BY NWFA HARDWOOD MAGAZINE ON JUNE 1, 2020

What makes a wood floor “award-winning”?

Is it unique, showcasing something that no one else can recreate in any other material? Having been born in the carpet capital of the world and having worked in the flooring industry in all the categories, one of the first things I do (as do many of you) is look down as soon as I enter a building. It’s a blessing or a curse that comes from my upbringing in Dalton, Georgia, and is also a direct result of having been trained to know on sight “excellence” in materials, quality, and craftsmanship. My parents have been in the commercial and industrial construction business for more than 60 years and always modeled that behavior of observing a building and deeming that it’s of good quality or not so good quality.

A custom installation of Emily Morrow Home’s Authentic Luxury in a herringbone

Over the years of looking at flooring that literally “floored me,” some of the common attributes were very customized, thoughtfully designed, and installed according to the specific clients’ unique wants and needs. Customization is where we can connect with the hearts of consumers who love hardwood for its inherent warmth, quality, and the special feeling someone gets when they know their floors are “fingerprint individually” made just for them. That’s the moment when we find a significant shift in a consumer’s decision-making process; when they determine if or if not their floors need to be unlike anyone else’s or at least not feel like it’s at every big box store across the nation.

During our quarantine period and while almost everyone was shut down for business, my business was rolling along since most of what I create is “made to order” and the “customized” sense. Most of the consumers who aren’t impacted by recessions or pandemics want something “unique” that requires a series of back and forth conversations about species, quality, performance, color, and overall aesthetics. To make that dream a reality, it takes someone committed to delivering something beyond their expectations. Customization isn’t just the product itself; it’s how the relationship is handled, it’s the services you offer, and it’s the attention to their life and their needs. Perhaps this is a carryover from being an interior designer for so long, or maybe it’s my wish to treat others as I want to be treated, but the consumer’s experience is part of the package.

Color-wise, it’s essential to know without a doubt what colors are selling, what colors are trending, and even more important than that is to be able to understand and explain “why.” Anyone can parrot what they’ve read or heard some design maven or color forecaster say at an event, but it is a different level of knowledge for someone to possess to be able to rely on the perspectives of history, how colors have and will be trending, and knowing where and how it makes sense for various parts of the country.

Travel is the best teacher.

Attending markets is another great way to add to that knowledge base. The looks that are selling well and are trending strongly in this new decade are warmer than in the past five years. That’s not to say some hint of taupe isn’t important, just that “warmth” is more desirable today than before. Our vernacular is going to have to shift along with the trends and to make certain the homeowners, the retail sales associates, the sales reps, the brands, and the manufacturers are all speaking the same language. If someone is asking for a warmer “white oak,” that might not mean they are thinking “red,” but rather a “touch of gold.” Specificity is needed, with pictures.

Speaking of pictures, scan through sites like Pinterest and Instagram and see what many users are posting. You’ll see a subtle change in the look. Remember when we couldn’t get enough of Joanna Gaines’ Shiplap? Well, even Joanna has changed her look.

The “farmhouse rustic” has become more of a “cottage with class.”

Rough-edged planks have morphed into smooth millwork. Shiplap of gapped rough sawn wood is now shiplap of smooth painted planks –similar, yet different.

Lighting is also changing with the looks of interiors and flooring. Notice now that as our metallics have gone all out “gold” or “old gold,” lighting is also putting out more lumens, thanks in part to newer LED light bulbs that can be warm or cool. Although brighter, LED lighting is also less forgiving,
and the surfaces of the finishes need to be much less reflective (matte), so that there’s little to no glare in the interior. Everything adds up to “the new look” when combining matte, light, and bright.

Flooring that falls into the new look includes rift sawn white oaks with wood rays, which say, “I’m the real thing.” Faux finishes are no longer in designers’ repertoire, but rather natural materials like plaster,hardwood, wool, cotton, and linen. Polyesters and plastics have their place in the world market, they just aren’t “aspirational” materials and aren’t in the “dream homes” of 2020. Clean and natural are adjectives once applied to our eating,but those same consumers have studied up and decided they like the look and feel of authentic hardwood. It stands to reason, that something so natural, that feels so right, has to be better for us to live with. For these reasons and many more, we should be seeing a gradual and noticeable return to authentic, real hardwood floors.

 

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Emily Morrow Finkell for NWFA | WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS 

Emily Morrow Finkell for Hardwood Floors Magazine NWFA | WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS 

The February March 2020 issue of Hardwood Floors celebrates the talented and dynamic women in our industry who have gone before us and worked amongst us. They smoothed the path, opened doors, and showed other women the way forward. I am so inspired by these women and would not be where I am today without their wisdom and guidance. Looking back on the lessons I’ve learned, and taking stock of how many influential and passionate women have inspired me never to stop growing, I hope what I do today will inspire others in the same way. While my career has gone through a series of changes, I know my journey would not have been possible with the support given to me by women in the industry.

THE VITAL ROLE OF WOMEN IN FLOOR COVERING

I’m fortunate to have a unique perspective on the power of women in flooring history, starting at a very early age. Growing up in Dalton, Georgia, I’ve witnessed generation after generation of women entrepreneurs acting as trailblazers and role models. If you’re familiar with the history of carpet, you’ll know it all started in Dalton along “Peacock Alley” with the crafting of hand-tufted chenille bedspreads, an industry started by extraordinary women like Dicksie Bradley Bandy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During the great depression, Dicksie and her husband’s country store had given credit to their customers who had no money to pay for the goods they needed, only their possessions, what they could make or grow themselves. The country store eventually became indebted to their suppliers and although there was no way to recoup the money from their customers, Dicksie and her husband were determined to repay every dollar. Determined to find a way to raise the funds, she boarded a train to Washington, D.C., carrying a suitcase filled with hand-tufted chenille bedspreads to sell to large department stores. She came home with enough money to repay her suppliers AND with enough orders to give several families an income for their craft. That simple cottage industry grew and evolved to the point where Dalton is now known not just the “carpet capital” but as the “floor covering capital of the world”. 

In this industry, not only are many of my peers women, but the majority of our customers are as well. We speak of “Ms. Consumer” as making more than 91% of the purchasing decisions for the home. With the purchasing power of women in the United States ranging from $5 trillion annually, we certainly MUST consider “her” in our business decisions, and we certainly MUST consult women on what goes into a new product launch. 

WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS

As I look back on my career path, I am grateful to the incredible women who so generously opened doors and encouraged me to go further and do do better. One such women was Evelyn Myers. In 2001 I had moved back to my hometown of Dalton from Carrollton, Georgia where I’d practiced interior design for 12 years. Although I was known in Dalton as Emily Kiker, I was not known by most as Emily Morrow, the interior designer. I did however know Mrs. Myers through my own mother and in some of our exchanges, she shared some of her upcoming “design-related” endeavors. It was that same year, 2001, Evelyn Myers invited me to be a guest designer in her “Judd House Designer Showhouse”, which would provide valuable networking opportunities with our local community, other designers and architects. If not for her invitation, I might not have had the change to meet the many contacts who later became my colleagues and bosses at Shaw Industries. 

Emily Morrow Featured in Atlanta Magazine November 2001 The Judd House owned by Evelyn Myers and the Myers Family.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LESSONS IN RESILIENCE AND PAYING DUES

Looking back, some of my early jobs were excruciating. One example was working for a family-owned women’s wear manufacturer whose owners would inadvertently exhale their cigarette smoke into my eyes causing me to leave work many days in tears. At the same time, they also gave me the chance to work with fabrics, color-ways, and the people that would be selling the apparel across the U.S. That experience was priceless. Soon I found myself training sales persons about the designs and colors of the coming collections.

Along the way, I learned about perseverance, resilience and the importance of hard work – even when it it seemed at the time like I was being pulled in the wrong direction. Balancing competing priorities had been modeled by my mother, a fantastic entrepreneur in her own right. As I began my own journey into motherhood as an interior designer, I carried with me the power of the examples and lessons that only magnified in importance over time. 

While I loved the work I was doing, after the arrival of my firstborn William, I was inspired to take a huge leap. The result was that my own interior design business was born. It was the culmination of all that I had learned and experienced up until then – and just when I thought I had it all “balanced” along comes Mary. Juggling motherhood to two small children with an interior design business taught me how to put first things first. My first design business operated in the West Georgia area for nearly 12 years, doing both commercial and residential design projects. 

Those years allowed me the experience of putting family first. It’s a lesson I’ve tried to live by since. I learned to be a mother first and foremost, and I had the flexibility and freedom to schedule design appointments around the schedules of babysitters, mothers’ mornings out, and my children’s own evolving schedules. 

ANSWERING THE OPPORTUNITY

The women in my life have taught me so many powerful lessons that I try to pass on to those who I have had the good fortune of knowing. One of the most important things I was taught is that like doors, opportunities can open and close quickly. Recognizing the opportunities requires a certain kind of “sixth sense” to know when to take them. Unfortunately, too often opportunities can seem daunting and present themselves as “risk”.

This lesson became a huge blessing as I faced a professional crossroads in 2002. Having just become a single mother, and after operating my own interior design business for many years, I was encouraged to move into the corporate world to provide the benefits my children and I would need. While there was some risk involved (would I be able to work the corporate hours? What if my kids needed me? How could I juggle my children’s activities with my travel schedule?…and much more) it was a leap that I was well-prepared to take for my family. 

So when asked if I could direct a large group of corporate professionals and juggle continually changing business priorities, I actually laughed out loud. That had become second nature to me. For years, at any given time, I had teams of painters, carpenters, flooring installers or other tradespeople going in and out of the businesses and homes of my clients, on time and budget, all while being a mother of two. Speaking of juggling priorities, one very important project, a medical arts building was being installed the very day I was in labor with the birth of my daughter. Needless to say, both “projects” demanded my attention that day but in the end, my family was only thing that truly mattered.

THE IMPORTANCE OF FAMILY

I hope that my experience demonstrates to other women – and men – in the industry that you can prioritize family and still have an enriching and successful career. That is perhaps the most important lesson of all, and one I hope to be remembered for, the same way I remember all of the incredible wisdom and support that was shared with me.

I encourage all of us to prioritize family and to allow everything else to fall into place. Following my own advice, I opted to leave a life of constant travel while working for a massive company, to instead revel in family. I chose to instead take a moment to savor my time being a new wife, a mother, and an empty nester.

When the time was right, I again took another risk, following my instinct, and formed a new enterprise, one that would eventually become relevant to husband’s own company. Who encouraged me to take that step? It was the same woman who inspired me nearly thirty years prior, my mother.

 

 

 

 

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DO YOU HAVE 2020 VISION? | Emily Morrow Finkell for NWFA Magazine


2020 Vision BY

Published By NWFA Magazine on  

As an over 50-year-old person who wears bifocals and has astigmatism, I can assure you that I don’t have perfect vision. What I do have, and offer to share with you, is my 2020 vision for design trends. The year 2020 is going to be one where we see that our specific market preferences are not entirely unlike 2019, but what will drive these preferences will be new and altogether unexpected. 

If you look at what is watched most often on streaming platforms, you’ll see that circa 1995 is very well represented. Shows like Friends have recently been rediscovered by the millennials (as they didn’t get to watch it when it was broadcast 25 years ago). Besides Friends and the reboot of Beverly Hills 90210, you’ll see cultural influences as seen on these shows from the ’80s and ’90s interiors emerging in 2020. As with every trend that has cycled from decades past, I asterisk them with this: Any trends from years past will undoubtedly be improved upon thanks to modern innovations.

These fashion trends aren’t just a passing fancy that will come and go quickly. Most likely, you can expect to have many “blasts from the past” making a big comeback. 

Behind almost every interior design trend, are the runway fashion trends that spark it, and haute couture houses like Louis Vuitton, Balmain, Saint Laurent, and Celine are hot on the ’80s while J. Crew specializes in making the ’80s trends applicable for the everyday person. Without going too far into “back to the future” mode, let me list some of the fashion trends that will impact interiors for 2020. 

From these trends, there will undoubtedly be some impact on our interiors choices, not in hardwood flooring, but as pops of color and sparkle for accessories. 

You may have already seen some of these examples in a Target or Home Goods store near you. For those of us in the floor covering world, we are all striving to stay one step ahead of trends, in the sweet spot of what matters most. Many years ago, I said there’s a big difference between trends and trendy, and to sum it up simply, trendy includes things that pop up and go quickly like reversible sequins on pillows, while trends are things that have a much longer shelf life, such as brushed gold lamps, fixtures, and accessories.

My eye is always on the longer sustaining trends, but knowing full well that the trendy can impact us unexpectedly.

Color and design professionals understand that the colors that are trending are affected by finishes, gloss levels, and even practical things like cleanability. That said, hardwood flooring colors are easily going to be well within the matte range of gloss levels. We can say with confidence that glossy-shiny is passé and will be for some time. We can also say that the reds, oranges, and wine-colored woods from the late ’90s and early 2000s aren’t coming back anytime soon. We do see the old-fashioned hand-scraped cider-colored floors on occasion, but it’s typically in an installation where the project was built without a designer or specifier involved.

In 2020, we will see a darkening neutral palette with more warm grays, charcoal to full black, as well as espresso browns.

The counterbalance to these dark neutrals will be accent-colored walls as well as lighter case goods and upholstery colors; creamy off whites with bright pops of color in trims; contrast welting, fringe, and tassels. 

With major companies tapping into the performance brand fabrics like Sunbrella, Crypton, and Revolution, consumers now are becoming more and more knowledgeable and thus confident in their expectations of life with a dog and an off-white sofa. (It can work.)

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Step into performance flooring, and you’ll find a wide variety of options as well. The hundreds of wood-looking vinyl, composite core, and ceramic products have so over flooded the market that consumers are looking around for something special. 

More times than not, they’re looking for the real thing…real wood is a real as it gets. 

Without a doubt, our digitally overstimulated appetite for ease and convenience is shifting to what is lasting and enduring. This is no different from when the over 50 crowd decided they wanted sophisticated and timeless classics instead of trendy styles that they tired of easily, or simply didn’t last long enough. My research time and again is turning up consumers who are asking for quality materials, and working with retailers and contractors who know their stuff and can guide them through the very confusing process of selecting hardwood flooring.

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What’s possible today wasn’t possible a few years ago, and that is waterproof and splash protection for hardwood flooring. 

Innovation, as defined by Merriam Websters Dictionary, is “a new advancement or a change made to an existing product, idea, or field” and manufacturers of floor covering are always innovating. Things that work for one category can sometimes be applied to an altogether different category, much like the transfer of using aluminum oxide in laminate flooring to hardwood flooring resulting in scratch-resistant surfaces. In the tidal wave of products that are “waterproof,” we can now find a handful of hardwood flooring brands that are protected from splashes, spills, and the occasional pet accidents. This is a giant step for our industry, which allows consumers new-found confidence that they can indeed turn back to real wood flooring.

Knowing that the Baby Boomers continue to age gracefully and carry their purchasing power with them into the decade of the ’20s, they will be a major catalyst that will influence our decisions for what they demand and what we manufacture. The same needs might apply to the performance of finishes to what they want and need.

The top design styles based on age is something to watch.

According to a recent Architectural Digest article by Lindsey Mather, “Millennials (those ages 18 to 34) are seemingly obsessed with modern, minimal midcentury design, called ‘mod visionary.’ Alessandra Wood, a design history Ph.D. and the director of style at Modsy, isn’t surprised. ‘Younger generations living in cities are likely living in smaller apartments and condos, so a minimalist aesthetic is more appropriate – perhaps even necessary – for the size of their spaces,’ she explains. ‘Midcentury-style furniture tends to feel more open and less bulky, and is known for being livable, which translates to both comfortable and stylish. Urban areas are also the prime location for the industrial aesthetic, with tons of converted lofts and newer buildings mimicking the loft-feel.”

The article also highlighted that the 55- to 65-year-old Baby Boomers, most often received ‘refined rustic’ as their result on the style quiz. “‘Refined rustic, in particular, blends classic forms with a more informal rustic style, suggesting that these generations are looking for a comfortable feel to their homes,’ says Wood. Perhaps life has taught them that a sharp-lined, sculptural armchair – a sure bet for millennials – isn’t what you want to cozy up in, well, ever.”

Besides performance innovations and the ’80s and ’90s fashion trends, which we will see in 2020, expect to see some familiar trends. 

Gray, taupe, greige, and chalky off-white are going to remain strong depending on where you are geographically. These neutral colors serve as long-standing timeless trends that won’t go away for quite some time as they are very practical, forgiving colors that help disguise the tracked-in dust and dirt of pets and people.

In a recent design project, my client showed me a photo of swept up shed dog hair from their chocolate lab. I emphasized the importance of that practical knowledge stating that it can be the perfect palette for their home so they won’t struggle with unsightly dog hair on their furnishings and flooring daily. In the same week that this client showed me their dog’s hair color, I also spoke to a group of regional flooring retailers and designers where one of the attendees stated, every person I know has a dog, and that dog rules their home or apartment. Employers are even permitting employees to bring their dogs to work as a way to attract and retain skilled and talented employees. We will see more and more performance, and pet-friendly features work their way into our world. With both fabrics and flooring already addressing this need, what will we see next?

Emily Morrow Finkell is an interior designer and CEO of EF Floors & Design LLC in Dalton, Georgia, a provider of hardwood floors and home furnishings, and an NWFA design contributor. She can be reached at emily@emilymorrowhome.com.

SOURCE: architecturaldigest.com/story/top-interior-design-stylesbased-on-age

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The State of Interior Design 2020

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Emily Morrow Home: Women in manufacturing are featured leaders at the Made in America Trade Show October 3-6th

We are BEYOND excited to be exhibiting with these amazing women-owned and led companies! I look forward to this week in Indianapolis. Be sure to check out the Emily Morrow Home Hardwood Floors in the Made In America LIVING ROOM and BEDROOM! Loominaries Handweaving​ Patricia Lukas, Holder Mattress Home Collection​ Lauren Taylor, Thomaston Mills​ Janet Wishnia. Individuals interested in attending the Made in America trade show can visit https://madeinamerica.com/event-attend/

Thank you!

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Women in manufacturing are featured leaders at the Made in America Trade Show, Jason Blount, 2019 Event Announcement, News 10/01/2019

First ever Made in America Trade show in Indianapolis, Oct 3rd to Oct 6th showcases consumer products Made in America. Features a Made in America Bedroom where all of the products are manufactured by women run businesses.

According to Consumer Reports, 8 out of 10 American consumers say they would rather buy an American-made product than an imported one. Entrepreneur Don Buckner became frustrated in 1998 when he attempted to find several American-made products online. That was the start of his journey which has culminated in his deciding to go all-in on the #AmericanMade plan.

His team searched for USA manufacturers, large and small, and established the first-ever Made in America Trade show. Come see a wide variety of American made products on display in Indianapolis running from Oct 3rd to Oct 6th

Did you know that more than 11.6 million firms are owned by women, employing nearly 9 million people, and generating $1.7 trillion in sales as of 2017? In fact, women run businesses are helping to lead a resurgence in American manufacturing. All of the firms chosen to display in the “All American Bedroom” are women run businesses.

The products, made by women lead companies, in the Made in America bedroom are as follows:

Bedding from https://americanblossomlinens.com

Mattresses from https://holdermattress.com/

Flooring from https://www.emilymorrowhome.com/

Rugs from www.loominaries.com

Emily Morrow Home

A woman-owned hardwood flooring company based in Dalton, Ga., Emily Morrow Home beautifully represents the American Dream. Although hardwood flooring has been a male-dominated industry that has sadly evolved into importing poorly made hardwood flooring, Emily Morrow Home is breaking the mold with quality, domestically-crafted products— and a commitment to doing things better…differently.

Like any good story, Emily Morrow Home began with a love story- a life-long love for design that grew into a profession. After almost 30-years of practicing interior design, 13 of which directing the design team for Shaw Floors, founder Emily Kiker Finkell entered a new chapter of life and launched the eponymous Emily Morrow Home. Included in Emily’s to-the-trade brand are beautifully designed collections of upscale hardwood flooring and luxury home décor, all proudly made in America.

From being inspired by the stunning vineyards of Napa Valley or the great wildebeest migration across Africa, each product within the Emily Morrow Home brand is designed to bring the world’s most stunning visuals home to her customers through local retailers. Emily Morrow sells through experienced small business flooring retailers across the nation, people with proven ability and craftsmanship Finkell donates a portion of proceeds to the Kiker Morrow Finkell Breast Cancer Foundation and participates in a prison work program that teaches inmates invaluable skills and work ethic.

For more inspiration and a more in-depth look into Finkell’s craft, visit her blog, https://www.emilymorrowhome.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-living-a-beautiful-life/, where you’ll find useful ideas and insights into home interior design as well as the simplest touches for adding joy to a day.

1-866-775-3877

American Blossom Linens

Thomaston Mills, a family owned textile mill, has been making bedding for over 115 years in the town of Thomaston, Georgia. While nearly all USA textile manufacturing and production moved overseas, decimating factories and jobs, Thomaston Mills continues to thrive and keeps manufacturing here in the USA. For the past 20 years, Thomaston manufacturing focused on the healthcare and hospitality market. Hilton, Marriott, Radisson and Intercontinental hotels have all used their sheets. Now they are offering a brand called American Blossom Linens direct to consumers.

In response to a massive rise in consumer demand for organic cotton and USA made products, Janet Wischnia, one of the owners of Thomaston Mills and granddaughter of the founder, decided to reenter the retail market in December 2018 with the launch of direct to consumer brand, American Blossom Linens. She brought back a brand, originally called Blossom that was created by Thomaston in the 1940’s with the goal of capturing the time tested quality of their origins. The collection, available now on the American Blossom Linens website, americanblossomlinens.com, includes sheet, pillowcase and duvet sets and a crib sheet. The linens are generously sized with extra deep pockets to provide an excellent fit on almost any height mattress. “Top or Bottom” labels act as visual cues to help you place the fitted sheet correctly on the mattress. Thomaston Mills wanted to make environmental responsibility easy, so they made the sheets more substantial, which helps them last longer and uses an advanced all-natural finishing process that softens the cotton to ensure a smooth feel.

American Blossom Linens bedding is made only in the USA using 100% traceable organic cotton grown in West Texas by family farmers. Their bedding is grown, processed, finished and sewn in the USA, drastically reducing its carbon footprint while supporting American workers all along the way. Thomaston Mills brought back American Blossom because they perceive people are looking for sustainable products, impeccably made in the USA by friends and neighbors, products that will last and last and never go out of style. American from the farm to the bed.

https://americanblossomlinens.com

888-825-0110 ext 2275

Holder Mattress

Since 1947, the Holder family has built a tradition of excellence by using the finest materials to construct their own mattresses and box springs. To this day, each set is still hand-crafted in their own factory in Kokomo, Indiana. All materials are carefully selected and sourced in the United States, meaning every Holder Mattress is not just made in Indiana but truly American Made. Attention to detail and craftsmanship and a standard of building a two-sided mattress or flippable mattress assures the Holder Mattress Factory standard of quality that has become notable throughout central Indiana.

In 2003, the granddaughter of the founder, Lauren McAshlan Taylor, assumed the reins as a third-generation owner. Lauren strives each day to build the quality of product her grandfather would have built himself, along with providing the highest level of customer service to her clients.

https://holdermattress.com/

1-800-879-9484

For as long as she can remember, Patricia has been intrigued by the art of weaving. Her first introduction to multi-harness looms was on a childhood visit to Sturbridge Village, a re-creation of an 18th century town in Sturbridge, Massachusetts. The gift Patricia received from her parents and husband upon her graduation from college was a four harness, 45” wide floor loom, which enabled her to create a greater variety of woven pieces. A magazine article about rag rugs shown to her by her mother sparked her interest and soon she began weaving her own rugs.

Patricia’s rugs began to catch the attention of interior designers, as well as home furnishing shops, and soon her business was transformed to the production of custom rag rugs which can be woven in any size up to twelve feet wide and any length. A move in November of 2015 to western North Carolina, surrounded by beautiful mountains and abundant wildlife, is the setting from which Patricia draws inspiration to create rugs which complement every style of home design.

Loominaires

www.loominaries.com

828-633-2187

The Made in America trade show runs from October 3rd thru 6th, more than 450,000 square feet of the Indiana Convention Center will be used to showcase hundreds of manufacturers including many small and women owned and run businesses who make products ranging from aerospace and automobiles to apparel and textiles. Organizers expect thousands of attendees. Events include a concert with country music duo Big and Rich, a talk by My Pillow founder Michael J. Lindell, a celebration honoring U.S. military veterans and “Made in America Awards” to recognize the accomplishments of American production heroes.

Individuals interested in attending the Made in America trade show can visit https://madeinamerica.com/event-attend/