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DO YOU HAVE 2020 VISION? | Emily Morrow Finkell for NWFA Magazine


2020 Vision BY

Published By NWFA Magazine on  

As an over 50-year-old person who wears bifocals and has astigmatism, I can assure you that I don’t have perfect vision. What I do have, and offer to share with you, is my 2020 vision for design trends. The year 2020 is going to be one where we see that our specific market preferences are not entirely unlike 2019, but what will drive these preferences will be new and altogether unexpected. 

If you look at what is watched most often on streaming platforms, you’ll see that circa 1995 is very well represented. Shows like Friends have recently been rediscovered by the millennials (as they didn’t get to watch it when it was broadcast 25 years ago). Besides Friends and the reboot of Beverly Hills 90210, you’ll see cultural influences as seen on these shows from the ’80s and ’90s interiors emerging in 2020. As with every trend that has cycled from decades past, I asterisk them with this: Any trends from years past will undoubtedly be improved upon thanks to modern innovations.

These fashion trends aren’t just a passing fancy that will come and go quickly. Most likely, you can expect to have many “blasts from the past” making a big comeback. 

Behind almost every interior design trend, are the runway fashion trends that spark it, and haute couture houses like Louis Vuitton, Balmain, Saint Laurent, and Celine are hot on the ’80s while J. Crew specializes in making the ’80s trends applicable for the everyday person. Without going too far into “back to the future” mode, let me list some of the fashion trends that will impact interiors for 2020. 

From these trends, there will undoubtedly be some impact on our interiors choices, not in hardwood flooring, but as pops of color and sparkle for accessories. 

You may have already seen some of these examples in a Target or Home Goods store near you. For those of us in the floor covering world, we are all striving to stay one step ahead of trends, in the sweet spot of what matters most. Many years ago, I said there’s a big difference between trends and trendy, and to sum it up simply, trendy includes things that pop up and go quickly like reversible sequins on pillows, while trends are things that have a much longer shelf life, such as brushed gold lamps, fixtures, and accessories.

My eye is always on the longer sustaining trends, but knowing full well that the trendy can impact us unexpectedly.

Color and design professionals understand that the colors that are trending are affected by finishes, gloss levels, and even practical things like cleanability. That said, hardwood flooring colors are easily going to be well within the matte range of gloss levels. We can say with confidence that glossy-shiny is passé and will be for some time. We can also say that the reds, oranges, and wine-colored woods from the late ’90s and early 2000s aren’t coming back anytime soon. We do see the old-fashioned hand-scraped cider-colored floors on occasion, but it’s typically in an installation where the project was built without a designer or specifier involved.

In 2020, we will see a darkening neutral palette with more warm grays, charcoal to full black, as well as espresso browns.

The counterbalance to these dark neutrals will be accent-colored walls as well as lighter case goods and upholstery colors; creamy off whites with bright pops of color in trims; contrast welting, fringe, and tassels. 

With major companies tapping into the performance brand fabrics like Sunbrella, Crypton, and Revolution, consumers now are becoming more and more knowledgeable and thus confident in their expectations of life with a dog and an off-white sofa. (It can work.)

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Step into performance flooring, and you’ll find a wide variety of options as well. The hundreds of wood-looking vinyl, composite core, and ceramic products have so over flooded the market that consumers are looking around for something special. 

More times than not, they’re looking for the real thing…real wood is a real as it gets. 

Without a doubt, our digitally overstimulated appetite for ease and convenience is shifting to what is lasting and enduring. This is no different from when the over 50 crowd decided they wanted sophisticated and timeless classics instead of trendy styles that they tired of easily, or simply didn’t last long enough. My research time and again is turning up consumers who are asking for quality materials, and working with retailers and contractors who know their stuff and can guide them through the very confusing process of selecting hardwood flooring.

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What’s possible today wasn’t possible a few years ago, and that is waterproof and splash protection for hardwood flooring. 

Innovation, as defined by Merriam Websters Dictionary, is “a new advancement or a change made to an existing product, idea, or field” and manufacturers of floor covering are always innovating. Things that work for one category can sometimes be applied to an altogether different category, much like the transfer of using aluminum oxide in laminate flooring to hardwood flooring resulting in scratch-resistant surfaces. In the tidal wave of products that are “waterproof,” we can now find a handful of hardwood flooring brands that are protected from splashes, spills, and the occasional pet accidents. This is a giant step for our industry, which allows consumers new-found confidence that they can indeed turn back to real wood flooring.

Knowing that the Baby Boomers continue to age gracefully and carry their purchasing power with them into the decade of the ’20s, they will be a major catalyst that will influence our decisions for what they demand and what we manufacture. The same needs might apply to the performance of finishes to what they want and need.

The top design styles based on age is something to watch.

According to a recent Architectural Digest article by Lindsey Mather, “Millennials (those ages 18 to 34) are seemingly obsessed with modern, minimal midcentury design, called ‘mod visionary.’ Alessandra Wood, a design history Ph.D. and the director of style at Modsy, isn’t surprised. ‘Younger generations living in cities are likely living in smaller apartments and condos, so a minimalist aesthetic is more appropriate – perhaps even necessary – for the size of their spaces,’ she explains. ‘Midcentury-style furniture tends to feel more open and less bulky, and is known for being livable, which translates to both comfortable and stylish. Urban areas are also the prime location for the industrial aesthetic, with tons of converted lofts and newer buildings mimicking the loft-feel.”

The article also highlighted that the 55- to 65-year-old Baby Boomers, most often received ‘refined rustic’ as their result on the style quiz. “‘Refined rustic, in particular, blends classic forms with a more informal rustic style, suggesting that these generations are looking for a comfortable feel to their homes,’ says Wood. Perhaps life has taught them that a sharp-lined, sculptural armchair – a sure bet for millennials – isn’t what you want to cozy up in, well, ever.”

Besides performance innovations and the ’80s and ’90s fashion trends, which we will see in 2020, expect to see some familiar trends. 

Gray, taupe, greige, and chalky off-white are going to remain strong depending on where you are geographically. These neutral colors serve as long-standing timeless trends that won’t go away for quite some time as they are very practical, forgiving colors that help disguise the tracked-in dust and dirt of pets and people.

In a recent design project, my client showed me a photo of swept up shed dog hair from their chocolate lab. I emphasized the importance of that practical knowledge stating that it can be the perfect palette for their home so they won’t struggle with unsightly dog hair on their furnishings and flooring daily. In the same week that this client showed me their dog’s hair color, I also spoke to a group of regional flooring retailers and designers where one of the attendees stated, every person I know has a dog, and that dog rules their home or apartment. Employers are even permitting employees to bring their dogs to work as a way to attract and retain skilled and talented employees. We will see more and more performance, and pet-friendly features work their way into our world. With both fabrics and flooring already addressing this need, what will we see next?

Emily Morrow Finkell is an interior designer and CEO of EF Floors & Design LLC in Dalton, Georgia, a provider of hardwood floors and home furnishings, and an NWFA design contributor. She can be reached at emily@emilymorrowhome.com.

SOURCE: architecturaldigest.com/story/top-interior-design-stylesbased-on-age

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Domotex USA 2020 | Emily Morrow Home to host Design Personified: Behind-the-Scenes Mill Tour

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Emily Morrow Home Featured on Fox News

Emily Morrow Home Hardwood was one of the featured manufacturers at the Inaugural “Made In America Expo” in Indianapolis, Indiana where Carley Shimkus of Fox & Friends News shared the story of our commitment to American-made, higher-end hardwood flooring that has a unique manufacturing model developed by Don Finkell, at American OEM, inside a medium security prison just west of Nashville, Tennessee. Click here to see the interview in full.

Fox & Friends News Carley Shimkus interviews Emily Morrow Finkell

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Saturday, October 5th, 2019 Fox & Friends interview Emily Morrow Home at the Made in America Expo where company was named the “Made In America Manufacturing Community Award” 2019 winner 

On Saturday October 5th, 2019 Fox & Friends Carley Shimkus interviewed Emily Morrow Home at the Made in America Expo in Indianapolis where the Emily Morrow Home Hardwood Company was named the “Made In America Manufacturing Community Award” winner.

The “Made In America Living Room”, designed by Emily Morrow Home, featured sliding chevron barn doors *made of sliced white oak from the same hardwood as the flooring in Montezuma, Indian, which coordinated with the warm gray white oak floors “Paddock”, a modified version of mid-century modern sofa made in Lenoir, North Carolina by Aria Designs, hand-woven rug and pillows made by Patricia Lukas’ Loominaries of Candler, North Carolina. The color palette of the Living Room was inspired by the American Flag which was featured among the made in America accessories.

The Made In America Emily Morrow Home Team: Spike Tilden, Don Finkell, Emily Morrow Finkell, Don Blair, and Joe Miller.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Made in America Community award was a nod to the “community” aspect of the prison industries enterprise which is at the heart of the Emily Morrow Home design aesthetic, artisanal visuals for hardwood flooring.Emily Morrow Finkell accepts the award as a way of showing her admiration for her husband Don Finkell’s lifetime of work with the prisoners within his program.

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If you would like to locate the nearest retailer(s) who carry the Emily Morrow Home Hardwood or the Louis A. Dabbieri Exclusively by Emily Morrow Home, feel free to contact us at info@emilymorrowhome.com, call 1-866-775-3877 or click here to locate your nearest retailer,

keeping in mind that our presence across the USA is growing weekly and it might not reflect the complete list of floor covering retailers.

 

 

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What does “MADE IN AMERICA” mean today?

Are you buying American?

 

Have you seen the news about an upcoming Made in America Exposition in Indianapolis, Indiana October 3rd through the 6th? Check it out! I think you might get as excited as I did when you see all the people and energy behind it. It might make your brain spin wondering “who” really is an All-American manufacturer. Proudly I’m exhibiting as the “Made in America Living Room” by Emily Morrow Home and showing the “Emily Morrow Home Hardwood Flooring” that is made in Tennessee by my husband’s company American OEM. Beyond the hardwood flooring we will be showing Aria Designs Upholstery that’s made in Lenoir, North Carolina, and hand-loomed rugs and pillows by artisan Patricia Lukas, owner of Loominaries of Candler, North Carolina. Just this afternoon, I had a call with another co-exhibitor at this MIA event who’s recently been stressing about the same challenges that I had: “Where do you find light bulbs or lamps that you can be certain are made in the USA? How pure can we actually remain with the various accessories that we place in our rooms at the expo? In regards to pillows, perhaps the fabric is made in the USA but the filler might be from overseas origins…where does the MIA intention begin and end? My intention is to stay within the practical realm when at all possible. The goal is to showcase all American-made products and to do our due diligence to make sure the hidden contents of the products are American as well.

 

Seeing through the fog

How hard is it to see through the fog of misleading messaging which products are and are not actually American-made? As an interior designer, a product designer, lifestyle brand and marketer, I have been tuned-in to this for many years. As an “insider” to the industry, you’d think it would be easier for me but it is very hard to know whose products are and whose are not American made. I can assure you that my hardwood flooring products are 100% American-made. Even our trees are responsibly grown and harvested from the eastern side of the USA and much of it comes from the great states of Indiana and Tennessee. It’s been said that “Southern Indiana grows the finest textured white oak timber in the world”. I don’t doubt that as our hardwood flooring is as beautiful as it is American.

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“French oak” or “Stolen Forests”

In the hardwood flooring category, there are hundreds of products that are veiled as “European” or “American” with luxuriously European or patriotic sounding names, with American flags on the graphics, playing on the “assumption” that this or that longstanding American brand / company/manufacturer’s products are made in the United States when in fact they’re not. Although I don’t have to like this, I do have to compete in this…and this world is not only highly competitive, it’s hard. The Decorative Hardwoods Association is a great resource if you’d like to read more about the subject of timber, legal and illegal.

You don’t have to compromise

We’ll be sharing more details about the design aesthetics of our Made In America EMILY MORROW HOME LIVING ROOM over the coming weeks. Meanwhile, I hope you’ll either plan to attend or follow the event, and more importantly won’t you consider doing business with American-made companies like my own Emily Morrow Home, or my amazing MIA friends: Holder Mattress Company, Wellborn Cabinets  and Loominaries ? You won’t have to compromise on style, quality or price and you might find that it will last longer, look better longer and one final thing is that you’ll have the sense of pride in the “American-made story” at the heart of your decisions. You can find our Emily Morrow Home Hardwood all across the USA as well as the Louis A. Dabbieri Hardwood Exclusively by Emily Morrow Home. Click this link to find our retailers near you and if you don’t find one, give me a call at 1-866-775-3877 and I’ll personally help you.

Check out our video library below featuring the design inspiration of our exquisite products, our OMG Proof Protection, Donatella the Truffle Dog and much more!

 

Enjoy your weekend!

Emily

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Unplugged: Powering Off Digital Allows Creative Inspiration to Flourish

Unplugged: Powering Off Digital Allows Creative Inspiration to Flourish

What Inspires You?

Inspiration. It’s at the heartbeat of the flooring industry and what keeps us all in the cycle of evolution. What inspires you? How are you inspired? When are you inspired?

Being a “creative” today is both a blessing and a curse. The blessing is that we are all constantly infiltrated with new perspectives, fresh ideas, more accessible travel, and, well, ideas. Within an instant, my newsfeed is taking me to an emerging high-rise project in Dubai; I’m in a train buzzing through wine country during harvest in an Instagram story; I’m watching a blogger’s design journey as she renovates a midcentury bungalow in San Francisco – while I am on Wi-Fi and in the air from LaGuardia to Paris. Information – too much information – is at my fingertips at breakneck speed.

Market Watch recently revealed that the average American adult spends 11 hours per day consuming digital media, which is up from 9 hours and 32 minutes only four years ago. But I did not need a study to tell me this news. My newest iPhone XS Max reveals my screen time usage, and the daily notification is staggering, to say the least. It leaves us all wondering, “Did I really look at my phone that much today?”

Do I Need Digital Detox?

While we’re consuming all of this media, how is our brain processing it? Studies show that the overconsumption of digital makes us feel differently, react differently, think differently, and sleep differently. According to a Mashable article from just a few years ago, some cognitive experts have found benefit in digital exposure and its effects on the human brain, whereas others worry that too many distractions have left our brains uncreative and impatient.

Digital has its place in the creative process; let’s be honest. After all, it’s 2019. Sites like Pinterest, Houzz, and the world of influencer marketing have made interior design and the floor shopping process engaging and attainable, and for that, the industry is grateful. But as “creative” professionals who are focused on pushing the design envelope ever forward on behalf of both the industry and our brands, how do we cut through the noise?

Slide to power off.

True creativity is not happening behind the screen. While the screen may reaffirm our ideas and give us a sense of belonging, the creative process does not begin or end on the screen. At the risk of sounding unapologetically cliché, the creative process is all around us in the most present and current sense. The creative process is sitting on the ground surrounded in paint swatches, white oak slices, frayed pieces of fabric, and a team of experienced professionals with sawdust in their eyes. It comes from digging deep in the parts of our minds, our hearts, and our souls, which technology cannot power up or power on.

Creativity is connectivity – with the human spirit, not a cable.

My most recent and prevalent example of unplugging for authentic creativity to prevail was during an African safari this past summer with my family. A once-in-a-lifetime experience, the journey allowed us to soak in the majesty of nature in all its raw splendor. From the journey, one of my newest collections was born.

Unplugging has become key to my creative process. And my wish is that it becomes key to yours as well. Keep that pen and notebook in your bag. Pull it out when an idea or inspiration strikes. Start up a conversation with the person in the plane seat next to you. Sit in a local coffee shop and people watch. Walk through a museum and read every exhibit marker. Laugh out loud with your chin up. It’s within all of this living and all of this connecting and the moments unplugged that creativity – true creativity – will flourish.

Whether or not we unplug from digital, the world isn’t going to stop. But as the future of the flooring industry and as “creatives,” it’s up to us to quiet the noise – so that we can create and continue to propel the industry forward. So, when you see me in the airport chatting up a stranger, sketching in my journal, or soaking in a beautiful moment, you’ll know it’s intentional.

Let us power off and create.

Where do you go from here? How do you power off more often? Here are some simple tips from Digital Detox to help you unplug:

  • Start your day right: Get up, relax, and eat a healthy breakfast instead of reaching for the phone.
  • Go old school: Get an old-fashioned flip phone instead of a smartphone.
  • Do more: Pack your day full of person-to-person meetings where you commit to not reaching for the phone.
  • Bring a book: Pick up a good read.
  • Download an app: Get some tech help in monitoring the time you spend on the phone.
  • Go on a digital diet: Reduce your time online by 10 percent.
  • Take a mini break: Leave your phone at home for a day.
  • Streamline your work: Ask that people connect with you only through one medium.
  • Get active: Jog or bike to work, phone free.
  • Leave your work behind: Consider a work phone and personal phone and utilize out of office.
  • Involve your friends: Invite your friends to keep you accountable.
  • Lock up: Ask a friend or partner to take your phone for a bit.
  • Set a strict technology bedtime: Your technology needs a bedtime, too.
  • Schedule some free time: Schedule tech time and then turn it off.
  • Be more in the moment: Go for a walk and soak in your surroundings.
  • Just switch it off: Enough said.

Emily Morrow Finkell is an interior designer and CEO of Emily Morrow Home Hardwood,  a div. of EF Floors & Design LLC in Dalton, Georgia, a provider of hardwood floors and home furnishings, and an NWFA design contributor. She can be reached at emily@emilymorrowhome.com.

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The World is Not Flat

 

Are We E-volving into Digitized Flat-World Consumers?

Did you know that the world is not flat? (Tell me something I didn’t know, right?) Well actually it’s way more than just round... Ancient greek philosophers like Aristotle, Eratosthenese and Pythagoras theorized that the world was a sphere and then centuries later explorers like Galileo and Magellan went out and proved them right. Navigating by the constellations above the horizon or seeing the round shadow of the earth during a lunar eclipse was ample proof that the earth was indeed not flat. “How does this tie into our modern day world of design?” you might ask. The world we live in today is round and yet many designers, consumers and hosts of companies who provide products for them treat the world as if it’s one dimensional. Look around you and consider all of the decisions you’re making based on a flat digital image. Our very tastes and behaviors are evolving towards what looks good on our Instagram accounts.

What looks good online doesn’t always look good in real life

As a professional interior designer who started my career 30 years ago, just before the internet became a thing, I have ALWAYS been drawn to textures that begged to be touched, memorable experiences that were intended be shared and artfully-layered interiors that beckoned me to sit for a while. Truly GREAT DESIGN, in my humble opinion, is steeped in art, science, architecture, culture and even a little bit of psychology. If done right, a well-designed space should invite the eye to come in, look around to find a focal point, experiencing the room in not only 3-D but by engaging the five senses.

Luxury Hardwood Flooring with “Good Sense”

With all of these thoughts in mind, take a little “Design Journey’ of your own through our newest collection of hardwood flooring, designed by an interior designer (yours truly), intended to be experienced by all five senses, and made to be a cut above everything else you’ll find in any big box store. Our hardwood flooring, like a luxury-performance vehicle, is not only beautiful, it demonstrates artisanal excellence that’s hand-crafted in the USA by an American hardwood flooring icon like my husband Don Finkell and his expert team who are passionate about what they do.

I am beyond thrilled to bring you luxurious hardwood flooring that, although is GORGEOUS, it performs well under a variety of conditions…whether it’s for a city dweller who sometimes spills a little coffee, or a dog-lover like me whose pooch splashes a little water or the busy family dashing out for a run or to tennis practice…bottom line, Emily Morrow Home is proof that beautiful design and great performance can be one and the same.

Cheers!

 

 

 

William & Mary: The dark, cultured color of William and Mary has an heirloom quality that imbues a home with European grace.

 

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Call Us (866) 775-3877

 

 

 

 

 

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Top Trends You’re Going to See Everywhere

Top Color Trends You’re Going to See Everywhere

By, EMILY MORROW FINKELL, Published by Hardwood Floors NWFA Magazine April 2, 2019

To borrow a fast food phrase, this season you can really “have it your way.” Do you want to use deeper, darker hues, or enjoy the ethereal effects of a layered off-white interior? Both are possible if you can’t decide.

Let’s say you’ve been eye-balling everything that pops up on social media feeds featuring navy blue or charcoal grey, but are afraid of being tied to that depth of hue. Do you think you might not want to live in so much darkness? Perhaps you’re imagining yourself coming into your home with the dreamy, creamy coolness and luxurious layers of off-whites and soft tans? That too is possible. In fact, you can do it all; it’s just a matter of balance – balance and a little smart strategy. The market certainly is offering endless options to consumers and providing tools making it easier to imagine via Pinterest, Instagram, and Twitter.

Just yesterday, I opened my Instagram feed to see several posts from paint companies, design firms, and furniture companies featuring headlines like “dark walls are amazing, especially when paired with a pop of brushed gold and a lot of natural light.” Usually, when anything is trending upward, people can get stuck in a wait-and-see mode until they start to see the various ways it can be done and they find one that seems familiar and doable for their own home.

Don’t Be Afraid of the DARK

When designing any category of flooring for upcoming trends, it goes without saying that we know quite well what colors homeowners are going to be drawn to and what they’ll be choosing for the new colors as they plan their updates. For me, it’s always fun to find a few surprises, and believe me, there are quite a few right now. One of the biggest surprises is that grey is still right in the mix. Seriously, since 2007 I’ve been pontificating about grey and eventually dealers started seeing the “value” of the color (if you’ll pardon the pun)…consumers were asking for it, and the dealers responded by buying pallets and rolls of grey flooring to fill consumers’ demand for something new, grey.

Whether it’s the Color Marketing Group (CMG), Pantone, Elle Décor, or House Beautiful, fashion and interior designers, design editors, and homeowners are still loving grey. It is making gradual changes and is finding new ways of entering spaces, either by undertones of other colors or by partnering with vibrant hues or extremely light neutrals. But no doubt about it, grey is still strong. Personal expression is going to be driving the trends – while they seem to be going in every different direction, the personalized element is the common thread.

My home is a petri dish

My own home has always been the best petri dish for anything going on in design, and I’ll admit that my paint colors have been grey since 2006 or 2007, starting with my Revere Pewter at both my former and my current homes. From our current home’s front door, which is “Bear Creek”, to our living room and keeping room, which are “Wrought Iron” and “Chelsea Grey”. What I love about grey is what the rest of the world loves about grey: it is so easy and looks smart. Whether your metallic finishes are oil-rubbed bronze, nickel, or the newest brushed gold, grey simply works. I know we will reach a day when we are ready to pitch it all out for something that is inconceivable today. I do remember when grey felt old and tired and we were drawn to warm colors like Hepplewhite Ivory and Adams Gold, circa the 1990s.

Emily Morrow Home Hardwood style “REFINED SIDE” contrasts nicely with the crisp white cabinets and walls.

Inhale and Release
I think the best way to encapsulate our new color trends discussion is to start at the end of 2018, where we began to see and feel “Inhale” and “Release” from CMG, a creamy white associated with deep meditative cleansing breaths to minimize stress as well as open up smaller spaces, visually expanding them. Who wouldn’t love that? White isn’t the only option for a small space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blurred Lines

City Grey
Then we turned the calendar page and leapt right into 2019 and discovered a new grey, City Grey, an internationally acclaimed dark neutral that is very dark, 70 percent black. Darker shades can play up the size and make it feel cozier. Dark colors blend and blur lines and corners much the same way they do in fashion and flatter practically everything that surrounds it. While we may have felt the “ahhhh” of the “Inhale and Release” in December, that was just to get us through the end of the year and ease us into the urban vibe and faster pace of 2019 with City Grey.

What’s new about this grey, you may ask? This has a little sheen to its finish, unlike the matte and muted greys. We are finding these greys influencing our other colors in the trends list. For example, our deep green certainly is deepened by black, and greyed pastels are tinted by lightening it with the addition of white.

According to CMG Contributors Judith van Vliet, Sandy Sampson, Mark Woodman, and Maryanne Cole, “Urban and urbane, City Grey is the look of color modernity. Originally emanating from CMG’s Asia Pacific 2017 color forecasts for 2019, its appeal is international, and its applications seemingly endless.

“Strong, decisive, and influential, City Grey is appealing as a neutral color that is anything but neutral. Its depth defines its bold stance, its contemporary attitude, and its decisive industrial edge. It connotes the foundation of the urban landscape, the hushed night as it falls over a city, and the fortitude of a cityscape.

“For interior, it casts a like attitude. Simple enough to coordinate with other aesthetics, City Grey is capable of standing on its own. As an accessory piece it takes on new substance; as a background, it demands to be seen; and in furnishings, flooring, textiles, and more, it creates an interior environment that comforts with its depth.”

The Dark Side

 

Overall, when you turn the pages of shelter magazines in the coming months, you’ll see deep, dark, not gloomy, but certainly dramatically dark receding walls, and mid-value darkish flooring accented with large-scale patterns in various pops of color in accessories. The deep greens we are seeing are akin to the hunter and pine greens of the late 1980s, as are the inky navy blues. The combination of the navy blue, hunter green, and a swath of black make Black Watch Plaid, which has made its presence known across various categories from runway fashion to interiors. Ralph Lauren elevates this trend well with the Black Watch Plaids from RL Home and RL Mens and Womenswear, as does Barbour for men, women, the home, and pets.

What does our industry do with this type of information? For starters, this information is applicable to your graphics, your logo, your brand imaging, and even your room scenes. And don’t forget that your retail and digital presence should reflect that you not only know the design trends but also know how to pair them with flooring. Your team should also be well-versed in the design and color trends so that they too can reflect your company well.

Great Migration Herringbone by Emily Morrow Home

Emily Morrow Finkell is an interior designer and CEO of EF Floors & Design LLC in Dalton, Georgia, a provider of hardwood floors and home furnishings, and NWFA design contributor. She can be reached at info@emilymorrowhome.com.

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Designing with Hardwood Floors at Emily Morrow Home

Designing with Hardwood Floors

By, Emily Morrow Finkell Published in NWFA Wood Flooring Magazine FEBRUARY 1, 2019

I’ve been in the interior design profession for what feels like a lifetime (nearly 30 years) and in the floor covering industry for more than 15 years. After all that time, it still always takes me by surprise when someone I consider to be experienced asks a question about where they can install hardwood flooring or the type of flooring they should use in specific projects. Recently while traveling, our guide said something that was both profound and witty: “I can explain it to you, but I can’t understand it for you.”

What I strive to do for my customers, friends, and the greater design community is to identify what they need to know, pinpoint what they don’t, and help them fully understand. One of the ways I do this is through a presentation I frequently present at designer events titled NWFA: Designing with Wood Floors. The CEU-eligible presentation analyzes the use of wood flooring as an element of design so that design professionals can become more familiar with wood floors to properly specify the product that will perform best in their clients’ projects. Being able to understand the advantages and maintenance of hardwood floors is part of growing in understanding hardwood flooring.

Furthermore, it dives in deeper in helping designers understand both the history and progression of the different types and species of wood floors so that they can specify hardwood floors in the best ways. Finally, the course helps explain how cut affects both the appearance and performance of wood floors. This is where I take off my industry hat and put on my designer hat and compare hardwood in the same light as diamonds, where the cut, clarity, and color change the look and value of the materials with which you are working. Hardwood floors are an organic material that naturally responds to its environment and can change over time. It’s important that designers have realistic expectations in regards to its performance and can explain that to their clients.

The Royals loved herringbone flooring

Historically hardwood floors were only enjoyed by royals and upper-class individuals because it required intense labor by expert craftsmen who would work on one floor for years. This is why many of the castles you might visit on a trip throughout Europe will still have the original hardwood floors intact. During our trip to Normandy, France, every interior we walked through, both modern and historical, had intricate herringbone and parquetry designed hardwood flooring. This is due to both the ease and accessibility of the smaller size of the wood used by the craftsman as well as the fact that these herringbone and parquet designs were, and still are, incredibly long-wearing if maintained properly.

Currently, we have a very diversified market where we can install on a wood subfloor or concrete slab, opening up more and more homeowners to the possibility of having hardwood floors in their homes. Today’s preferences are for domestic species like white oak, maple, and hickory with waterborne finishes due to increasing EPA VOC regulations. It has reached the point now where it’s expected that the products will be GreenGuard certified, and don’t be surprised for the specifier to ask about the safety of the product.

The shift in the marketplace has gone from primarily solid and partially engineered to the reverse due to the versatility and dimensional stability of engineered hardwood floors. There are plusses and minuses of each, but the plusses are now stacked more strongly behind engineered. Most people want a certain look at a certain price, and engineered hardwood floors allow manufacturers to take a particular cut of hardwood that might come at a premium and make that the featured surface layer of their products. Both solid and engineered floors can be sanded and refinished, but solid offers the opportunity for more numerous times than engineered. The sandability of engineered hardwood floors depends on the thickness of the top veneer layer. Additionally, engineered can be installed above, on, or below grade. Because of its cross-ply construction, engineered floors are more dimensionally stable, allowing for installation on wood or concrete subfloors, which includes basements.

 

What are the NEWEST Colors and HOTTEST Finishes?

Beyond solid and engineered, the options shift to finishing, which includes site finished, where the finish is applied on the jobsite. The other option is factory finished, where the finish is applied at the manufacturing facility. The manufacturing environment for factory-finished products also allows for enhancements like UV lights on the finish line, as well as adding aluminum oxide for scratch-resistant surfaces. Another aspect of finishes is that the color possibilities are truly endless; there is something for everyone. The 2019 Essential Trends: Color and Style Forecast for hardwood floors was recently released in the October 2018 issue of Hardwood Floors and further details my thoughts on the colors to watch this year. Grays are still strong, taupes are on strong hence the Emily Morrow Home 2019 Color of the Year being named “Tusker Taupe” as well as gesso-plaster white effects as well as the other end of the spectrum with the luxurious deep black of “Total Eclipse” and dark chocolate “William & Mary” (pictured below).

Luxury hardwood is like diamonds

As in diamonds, the cut of hardwood dictates its appearance. In the 1800s, quartersawn was typically used due to both the fashion and function of the times. Today, many hardwood floors are made from plainsawn cut wood because it is a more efficient cut with less waste. In the design world, I frequently get requests for rift and quartered partially for its look as well as for its cache. Rift and quartered is more efficient today with minimal waste but has a longer production time, which does add to the expense of the product. See the graphics below for additional details on how the different types of cuts affect the appearance of the wood.

Emily Morrow Finkell admiring the beauty of the rift & quarter hardwood medullary rays in the newest introductions “Emily Morrow Home Hardwood Exclusively for Louis A. Dabbieri” with Michael Standridge of American OEM.

 

 

Caution: Having Hardwood floors Can Make you LOVE your Home More

The bottom line and the sweetest part of this flooring material is that its advantages and benefits far outweigh any negatives. It adds stability and overall value to the structure, provides excellent insulation, and is durable, long-lasting, hypoallergenic, beautiful, sustainable, and timeless, creating a sense of pride and enjoyment for a life well lived.

Emily Morrow Finkell is an interior designer and CEO of EF Floors & Design LLC in Dalton, Georgia, a provider of hardwood floors and home furnishings, and NWFA design contributor. She can be reached at emily@emilymorrowhome.com.

 

 

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#VoteEmily and Give Back at Surfaces 2019

Can you believe it? Surfaces is here!

Here at Emily Morrow Home, we’ve been busy putting the finishing touches on our beautiful new hardwood products and our theme this year is “Design Journey.” If you find yourself in Las Vegas this coming week, please plan to come visit us in Booth #925 at Surfaces 2019! You won’t be disappointed in our gorgeous new products, unmatched craftsmanship and designer-inspired color palette.

Also, we’re very proud to announce that Emily Morrow Home is nominated for three Floor Covering Weekly Dealers’ Choice Awards. Visit our Campaign Page for more information on how to post to our selfie “Snap and Give” campaign. For every selfie submitted Emily Morrow Home will be making a $3 donation to the Floor Covering Industry Foundation.
To find out more about what FCIF is doing for those in the flooring industry click here. Please #VoteEmily!

We’ll see you very soon!

Emily & Team