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Donatella the Truffle Dog will send you 2 free “puppy-size” EMH hardwood samples when you text ‘EMILY2’ to 900900

Happy Monday!

Donatella the Truffle Dog and I are offering a little extra help as we all work to get through the next few weeks of living in a world where quarantining is the best and smartest option. With our digital marketing capabilities we can easily process hundreds of requests for small hardwood samples in any given time without you having to trouble yourself. Once we send out confirmation that the sample order is going out, we provide the ‘nearest retailer’ information, give hardwood flooring and on occasion answer design-related questions…all of which I believe helps close the sale for you.

Feel free to use our COUPON CODE of “EMILY2” with your sales associates, your designers or any customers that you think can benefit from this service.

Simply text “EMILY2” to 900900 and we’ll take it from there!

Thank you!!!

 

 

 

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Sharing Her Story by Burt Bollinger for NWFA Magazine

SHARING HER STORY BY BURT BOLLINGER

Published February 3, 2020 NWFA Magazine
Emily Morrow Home

Emily Morrow Finkell is providing her customers with American-made hardwood flooring with a very personal touch. With the launch of Emily Morrow Home, she has infused her life-long love of interior design into a series of made-to-order flooring collections that both tell stories and bring her unique life experiences into customers’ homes. This life experience includes more than three decades as an interior designer and flooring expert, including serving as Shaw Industries’ Director of Color, Style, and Design. “I’ve worked with a lot of wonderful people who taught me so much. Beyond interior design, I’ve learned so much about curating products into a collection as well as creating and launching a brand. I’ve learned the importance of knowing how to tell a story and how to make it easy to understand,” explains Morrow. Morrow’s first step to build her story outline was in-depth research. To do this, Morrow traveled the country, visiting with friends and flooring experts to seek out their input on what they wanted to see. She came away from those conversations knowing that they wanted something unique…something that could not be found at big box locations. “Those I reached out to wanted a brand that spoke to quality. However, they also wanted something they did not have to inventory, but rather work with sources that know the art of working with the design trade,” says Morrow. In addition to a brand that met these criteria, Morrow says she knew she wanted to speak to the idea of social responsibility and giving back. It’s a story that she has been able to tell through Emily Morrow Home’s manufacturer, American OEM’s unique set up, where the hardwood flooring is made-to-order in a plant located inside of a medium-security prison in Tennessee.

“Working with American OEM not only helps these men become reformed citizens, but they also become trained skilled craftsmen,” says Morrow. “By the time they are released, not only have they been paid, but they are frequently able to get jobs with us after they are released. It’s a program my husband, Don Finkell, developed in eight plants during his career in manufacturing hardwood flooring.” From a practical perspective, Morrow also believes this unique manufacturing process leads to stunning visuals. “It gives us so much design flexibility, and when so many dedicated hands can come together on a product, it allows us to do amazing things with wood. For example, some of our designs feature heavy scrapes, with black rubbed into the scrape. That said, for customers who have refined tastes, we also provide more traditional looks,” says Morrow. The unique manufacturing approach provides her collection to designers in a somewhat non-traditional way. “Rather than having to inventory all of this in their warehouses, because the team can turn orders quickly, buyers don’t have to commit a lot of capital for truckloads or freighters,” explains Morrow. As another way to make her brand unique and stand apart from others on the market, Morrow says it was vital that she told personal stories with color, style, and design.“It’s important that every style has a personal story behind it,” says Morrow. As one example, she was even able to gain color inspiration from her family trip to Kenya. “We were enjoying being unplugged, in the middle of the Serengeti plain, and while there I was completely filled with inspiration by the great migration of wildebeests. From the two weeks on safari came our EMH Color of theYear for 2019, Tusker Taupe, as well as our other newest colors, Great Migration, Moon River, and Serengeti Spirit.”

SPREADING THE WORD

Following Emily on Instagram yet? If not perhaps you are on Facebook? How about Twitter?  For Morrow, the final piece of her brand’s puzzle would be how she communicates her brand’s story to the world. In addition to creativity and finding inspiration from life experiences, Emily Morrow stresses the importance of digital marketing as a way to share her brand’s unique story. “Social media is essential, and everyone should be engaging with consumers through it. My advice with digital marketing is that we should make it personal if at all possible,” explains Morrow. “Today, there are so many ways to reach out to not just retailers and designers, but end-users to create demand and brand recognition. Ultimately, everyone has to do it their way and do what makes the most sense for their customer base, but everyone should try to find a way to tell their brand’s own unique story in as personal a way as possible.”

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Emily Morrow Finkell for NWFA | WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS 

Emily Morrow Finkell for Hardwood Floors Magazine NWFA | WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS 

The February March 2020 issue of Hardwood Floors celebrates the talented and dynamic women in our industry who have gone before us and worked amongst us. They smoothed the path, opened doors, and showed other women the way forward. I am so inspired by these women and would not be where I am today without their wisdom and guidance. Looking back on the lessons I’ve learned, and taking stock of how many influential and passionate women have inspired me never to stop growing, I hope what I do today will inspire others in the same way. While my career has gone through a series of changes, I know my journey would not have been possible with the support given to me by women in the industry.

THE VITAL ROLE OF WOMEN IN FLOOR COVERING

I’m fortunate to have a unique perspective on the power of women in flooring history, starting at a very early age. Growing up in Dalton, Georgia, I’ve witnessed generation after generation of women entrepreneurs acting as trailblazers and role models. If you’re familiar with the history of carpet, you’ll know it all started in Dalton along “Peacock Alley” with the crafting of hand-tufted chenille bedspreads, an industry started by extraordinary women like Dicksie Bradley Bandy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During the great depression, Dicksie and her husband’s country store had given credit to their customers who had no money to pay for the goods they needed, only their possessions, what they could make or grow themselves. The country store eventually became indebted to their suppliers and although there was no way to recoup the money from their customers, Dicksie and her husband were determined to repay every dollar. Determined to find a way to raise the funds, she boarded a train to Washington, D.C., carrying a suitcase filled with hand-tufted chenille bedspreads to sell to large department stores. She came home with enough money to repay her suppliers AND with enough orders to give several families an income for their craft. That simple cottage industry grew and evolved to the point where Dalton is now known not just the “carpet capital” but as the “floor covering capital of the world”. 

In this industry, not only are many of my peers women, but the majority of our customers are as well. We speak of “Ms. Consumer” as making more than 91% of the purchasing decisions for the home. With the purchasing power of women in the United States ranging from $5 trillion annually, we certainly MUST consider “her” in our business decisions, and we certainly MUST consult women on what goes into a new product launch. 

WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS

As I look back on my career path, I am grateful to the incredible women who so generously opened doors and encouraged me to go further and do do better. One such women was Evelyn Myers. In 2001 I had moved back to my hometown of Dalton from Carrollton, Georgia where I’d practiced interior design for 12 years. Although I was known in Dalton as Emily Kiker, I was not known by most as Emily Morrow, the interior designer. I did however know Mrs. Myers through my own mother and in some of our exchanges, she shared some of her upcoming “design-related” endeavors. It was that same year, 2001, Evelyn Myers invited me to be a guest designer in her “Judd House Designer Showhouse”, which would provide valuable networking opportunities with our local community, other designers and architects. If not for her invitation, I might not have had the change to meet the many contacts who later became my colleagues and bosses at Shaw Industries. 

Emily Morrow Featured in Atlanta Magazine November 2001 The Judd House owned by Evelyn Myers and the Myers Family.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LESSONS IN RESILIENCE AND PAYING DUES

Looking back, some of my early jobs were excruciating. One example was working for a family-owned women’s wear manufacturer whose owners would inadvertently exhale their cigarette smoke into my eyes causing me to leave work many days in tears. At the same time, they also gave me the chance to work with fabrics, color-ways, and the people that would be selling the apparel across the U.S. That experience was priceless. Soon I found myself training sales persons about the designs and colors of the coming collections.

Along the way, I learned about perseverance, resilience and the importance of hard work – even when it it seemed at the time like I was being pulled in the wrong direction. Balancing competing priorities had been modeled by my mother, a fantastic entrepreneur in her own right. As I began my own journey into motherhood as an interior designer, I carried with me the power of the examples and lessons that only magnified in importance over time. 

While I loved the work I was doing, after the arrival of my firstborn William, I was inspired to take a huge leap. The result was that my own interior design business was born. It was the culmination of all that I had learned and experienced up until then – and just when I thought I had it all “balanced” along comes Mary. Juggling motherhood to two small children with an interior design business taught me how to put first things first. My first design business operated in the West Georgia area for nearly 12 years, doing both commercial and residential design projects. 

Those years allowed me the experience of putting family first. It’s a lesson I’ve tried to live by since. I learned to be a mother first and foremost, and I had the flexibility and freedom to schedule design appointments around the schedules of babysitters, mothers’ mornings out, and my children’s own evolving schedules. 

ANSWERING THE OPPORTUNITY

The women in my life have taught me so many powerful lessons that I try to pass on to those who I have had the good fortune of knowing. One of the most important things I was taught is that like doors, opportunities can open and close quickly. Recognizing the opportunities requires a certain kind of “sixth sense” to know when to take them. Unfortunately, too often opportunities can seem daunting and present themselves as “risk”.

This lesson became a huge blessing as I faced a professional crossroads in 2002. Having just become a single mother, and after operating my own interior design business for many years, I was encouraged to move into the corporate world to provide the benefits my children and I would need. While there was some risk involved (would I be able to work the corporate hours? What if my kids needed me? How could I juggle my children’s activities with my travel schedule?…and much more) it was a leap that I was well-prepared to take for my family. 

So when asked if I could direct a large group of corporate professionals and juggle continually changing business priorities, I actually laughed out loud. That had become second nature to me. For years, at any given time, I had teams of painters, carpenters, flooring installers or other tradespeople going in and out of the businesses and homes of my clients, on time and budget, all while being a mother of two. Speaking of juggling priorities, one very important project, a medical arts building was being installed the very day I was in labor with the birth of my daughter. Needless to say, both “projects” demanded my attention that day but in the end, my family was only thing that truly mattered.

THE IMPORTANCE OF FAMILY

I hope that my experience demonstrates to other women – and men – in the industry that you can prioritize family and still have an enriching and successful career. That is perhaps the most important lesson of all, and one I hope to be remembered for, the same way I remember all of the incredible wisdom and support that was shared with me.

I encourage all of us to prioritize family and to allow everything else to fall into place. Following my own advice, I opted to leave a life of constant travel while working for a massive company, to instead revel in family. I chose to instead take a moment to savor my time being a new wife, a mother, and an empty nester.

When the time was right, I again took another risk, following my instinct, and formed a new enterprise, one that would eventually become relevant to husband’s own company. Who encouraged me to take that step? It was the same woman who inspired me nearly thirty years prior, my mother.

 

 

 

 

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Domotex USA 2020 | Emily Morrow Home hosting Design Personified Lunch & Learn for Designers & Retailers

Don’t miss this special ticketed event

Design Personified | Turning Trends into Reality

Feb. 6, 2020 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM 


Emily Morrow Home is hosting the 3rd annual EMH Design Panel and  the 2nd annual Designer event at Domotex USA, February 6th, 2020.

Having an understanding of today’s trends is extremely important when helping customers with their décor choices. However, many of these “trends” can seem unrealistic to a consumer who is living in a dated home. They want to incorporate the latest looks into their décor but feel it is impossible without undergoing a major renovation.

By attending the Designer Personified panel discussion, you will learn how to tackle this challenge and more. Attendees will hear from leading designers as they share the latest design trends, discuss the difference between “trends” and “trendy,” and teach valuable “tricks of the trade,” you can use to help customers realistically incorporate fresh, lasting looks they love.

Pricing

  • $55 through Dec. 17
  • $65 Dec. 18 Feb. 4
  • $75 onsite

Space is limited.

REGISTER

View profile

Emily Morrow Finkell 

CEO and Founder of Emily Morrow Home

View profile

Jane Dagmi

Designers Today
View profile

Michel Smith Boyd

Michel Smith Boyd Interiors
View profile

Pacita Wilson

Pineapple Park
View profile

Jenny Wagner

J. Thomas Designs
View profile

Mark Woodman

Mark Woodman Design + Color, LLC
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Domotex USA 2020 | Emily Morrow Home to host Design Personified: Behind-the-Scenes Mill Tour

DOMOTEX USA Header

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The State of Interior Design 2020

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Emily Morrow Home to Announce 2020 Color of the Year & Domotex USA Designer Events Teaser

EMILY MORROW HOME Coming to a city near you…and DOMOTEX USA 2020

2019 has been a GREAT YEAR…. It’s been a year of growth for starters to the point now where we have a total of 36 active styles and a gorgeous portfolio of “custom designed” specified projects for commercial projects. We have loved seeing YOU and your clients embrace our newest introductions such as our 2019 Color of the Year “TUSKER” as well as some very exciting surprises. Naturally as a veteran in the floor covering and interior design industry, I always expect certain parts of the country to embrace trends ahead of others, and enjoy seeing how that has evolved over the years.

Going into 2020, a whole new decade, expect to see some major shifts in the color, style and design world. It’s been a very neutral palette for quite some time and we’ve needed comfort, nurturing and calm. With a booming economy and a raging appetite for change in our interiors, (just like our appetites for spicy food on the days that follow the Thanksgiving turkey) you can enjoy seeing merging and blending of various design styles like mid century modern with 70’s and 80’s design elements, with vivid wall coverings, playful layering of patterns and what I love to call “MAXIMALISM”. For a visual reference of what “Maximalist” style is, allow me to introduce you to one of the many new SUPER TALENTED friends I made during this year’s Designer’s Today Magazine DESIGNER EXPERIENCE ATLANTA, Kurt Jacob Miller also known as Maximalist Style in Chicago, Illinois. 

This November I had the honor and pleasure of being a sponsor of the first ATLANTA DESIGNER EXPERIENCE, created and hosted by Designer’s Today Magazine. Jane Dagmi, Editor in Chief, along with her team, both inspired and warmed my heart! The guest panelists were stellar as were the designers themselves. I love Jane’s editorial about the event since it so perfectly sums up how I felt at the conclusion of the DX-ATL read here… in her own words.

Stay tuned for more updates that include Jane Dagmi, some of the NEW Design Super Stars like Michel Smith Boyd of Michel Smith Boyd, Pacita Wilson of Pineapple Park,  Jenny Wagner of J. Thomas Designs and our “encore” panelist Mark Woodman Design + Color, all of whom will be part of our Emily Morrow Home Design Panel February 6th, 2020 at Domotex USA. The panelists although kept under wraps until this past week are listed below. We also have a once in a lifetime opportunity EMH Mill Tour to give you a behind the scenes look at how our hardwood flooring is made, inside a medium security prison. We take care of all the details, from snacks to background checks, we’ve got you covered. Click to register early as this is a limited seat event.

You SHOULD BE GOING!!! See links for DOMOTEX USA EARLY BIRD Registration.

Happy Holidays and an even HAPPIER 2020!!!

Emily

 

 

 

Design Personified: Behind-the-Scenes Mill Tour


Earn CEUs while Touring the Manufacturing Facility where Emily Morrow Home Products are made Feb. 4, 2020 7:00 AM – 7:00 PM

An exclusive mill tour experience with transportation, CEU presentation, and lunch all provided.

To accommodate DOMOTEX USA attendees as well as Nashville-areal designers, chartered transportation will pick-up at two locations:

    • – Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Ga.
    • – Myers Carpet in Nashville, Tenn.

Once aboard the bus, we will drive to Nashville, enjoy lunch together (included), tour the manufacturing facility while earning CEU credit, and return. It will be a busy day full of networking and learning. A more detailed timeline will be provided closer to the event. Please note a government-issued ID will be required to enter the prison.

Space is limited and event registration is required. Please click here to begin registration. Early Bird registration by December 20 receives a special gift. Final registration cut off is January 17.

Turney-1

 

*Note this is a special ticketed event.

**TOUR PARTICIPANT QUALIFICATIONS.  All tour participants must agree to the following tour participant terms during the pre-registration process:

Having an understanding of today’s trends is extremely important when helping customers with their décor choices. However, many of these “trends” can seem unrealistic to a consumer who is living in a dated home. They want to incorporate the latest looks into their décor but feel it is impossible without undergoing a major renovation.

By attending the Designer Personified panel discussion, you will learn how to tackle this challenge and more. Attendees will hear from leading designers as they share the latest design trends, discuss the difference between “trends” and “trendy,” and teach valuable “tricks of the trade,” you can use to help customers realistically incorporate fresh, lasting looks they love.

Special Ticket Pricing

  • $55 through Dec. 17
  • $65 Dec. 18 Feb. 4
  • $75 onsite

Space is limited.

REGISTER NOW for Design Panel Lunch & Learn Thursday, February 6th, 2020

Emily Morrow Finkell

Moderator
CEO, Emily Morrow Home

Jane Dagmi

Designers Today

Michel Smith Boyd

Michel Smith Boyd Interiors

Pacita Wilson

Pineapple Park

Jenny Wagner

J. Thomas Designs

Mark Woodman

Mark Woodman Design + Color, LLC

 

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“How was the Made In America Expo?”

For everyone who has asked me “How was the Made In America Expo?”, It was GREAT! The organization brought together a great body of manufacturers large and small who all believe that together we can do anything. We were interviewed and our products and story of how our products are made were featured on Fox & Friends News with Carley Shimkus. Additionally we received the Made In America Manufacturing Community Award where I humbly acknowledged my husband Don Finkell’s commitment to making beautiful American products.

We made great new friends and walked away excited (and exhausted). It was very worthwhile and I encourage YOU to consider exhibiting in 2020 at www.madeinamerica.com 🇺🇸!

Jonathan Holiday of Made In America, Emily Morrow Finkell (CEO Emily Morrow Home and MIA award recipient) and Don Finkelll (CEO American OEM).
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Saturday, October 5th, 2019 Fox & Friends interview Emily Morrow Home at the Made in America Expo where company was named the “Made In America Manufacturing Community Award” 2019 winner 

On Saturday October 5th, 2019 Fox & Friends Carley Shimkus interviewed Emily Morrow Home at the Made in America Expo in Indianapolis where the Emily Morrow Home Hardwood Company was named the “Made In America Manufacturing Community Award” winner.

The “Made In America Living Room”, designed by Emily Morrow Home, featured sliding chevron barn doors *made of sliced white oak from the same hardwood as the flooring in Montezuma, Indian, which coordinated with the warm gray white oak floors “Paddock”, a modified version of mid-century modern sofa made in Lenoir, North Carolina by Aria Designs, hand-woven rug and pillows made by Patricia Lukas’ Loominaries of Candler, North Carolina. The color palette of the Living Room was inspired by the American Flag which was featured among the made in America accessories.

The Made In America Emily Morrow Home Team: Spike Tilden, Don Finkell, Emily Morrow Finkell, Don Blair, and Joe Miller.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Made in America Community award was a nod to the “community” aspect of the prison industries enterprise which is at the heart of the Emily Morrow Home design aesthetic, artisanal visuals for hardwood flooring.Emily Morrow Finkell accepts the award as a way of showing her admiration for her husband Don Finkell’s lifetime of work with the prisoners within his program.

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If you would like to locate the nearest retailer(s) who carry the Emily Morrow Home Hardwood or the Louis A. Dabbieri Exclusively by Emily Morrow Home, feel free to contact us at info@emilymorrowhome.com, call 1-866-775-3877 or click here to locate your nearest retailer,

keeping in mind that our presence across the USA is growing weekly and it might not reflect the complete list of floor covering retailers.