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In memory of Evelyn Myers | WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS 

February 22, 2021 —Honoring the memory and legacy of Evelyn Myers

If you aren’t from our part of the country (Dalton, Ga) I’ll let you in on a little secret… we are surrounded by some very strong and smart women. Case in point is Evelyn Myers, who co-founded Myers Flooring in 1957 with her husband Gene Myers. Myers Flooring grew over the years with stores in Atlanta, Nashville as well as the first one in Dalton. Myers has always had that extra something that feels stylish, classy and a cut above. This was somewhat radical when compared to the stereotypical carpet retailers of the 1960’s-1970’s. Myers was known for going the extra mile in marketing by staging live photo shoots inside real home interiors (lovely homes) in order to show floor covering in the most aspirational light. To this day, Mrs. Myers and the influence of her sons Rick and Ray is ever-present. Anytime you walk into one of the three Myers locations, you’ll know and feel you are in very capable hands, and if you walk into the Nashville store, you will see it personified in the form of third generation Sinclair Myers.  My interaction with Mrs. Myers was unique in that we would run into each other from time to time in Dalton or Chattanooga, and she would ask me about my interior design business, asking if I was ever moving back to Dalton, et cetera. If you’ve ever been in the presence of someone whose smile radiates light and warmth, then you’d know what it felt like for me as a young interior designer, Mrs. Myers had that gift and made me feel special.

Prior to the opening of the Judd House, I asked for a special favor, and that was to be able to use the frame picture of Evelyn Myers (elegantly perched on the wing of an airplane) in one the of rooms I’d designed in the “upstairs guest bedroom”. Everyone who entered would go immediately to the framed portrait and remark at how beautiful she was…and she truly was beautiful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gene Myers, with the help of his wife Evelyn, and later sons Rick and Ray, opened Dalton’s first carpet store

As quoted at Myers Carpet About Us: The company was founded in 1957 by Gene Myers, who started buying scraps of carpet from local mills and reworking them into stair treads and small rugs which he then sold through area chenille stores on “Peacock Alley” on Georgia Highway 41. Gene Myers, with the help of his wife Evelyn, and later sons Rick and Ray, opened Dalton’s first carpet store and began offering carpet from Dalton’s local mills. Patcraft was first. Later, Art Black, founder of Evans and Black Carpet of Arlington, Texas, gave Myers his first line. Gene Myers passed away in 1981 at age 53 and the company was then managed by sons, Rick and Ray Myers. In 1987, Myers Carpet opened a 3000 square-foot showroom on Peachtree Street in Atlanta, Georgia. Six years later they purchased and moved into a 35,000 square-foot showroom and warehouse at 1500 Northside Drive. That location quickly became the flagship store for Myers. In 1998, Myers Flooring was opened in Nashville, Tennessee, followed by the purchase in 2001 of the showroom and warehouse of Division Street Carpets at 641 Division Street in downtown Nashville. Myers Flooring of Nashville then purchased the assets of Van Gilmore’s Nashville Carpet Center in 2016 and combined the two businesses and employees at our current location at 2919 Sidco Drive in Nashville.

“Myers Carpet Company was the first and remains the oldest carpet store in Dalton, Georgia, “The Carpet Capital of the World.

Below is an article about “women inspiring others” in National Wood Flooring Association’s Hardwood Floors Magazine | WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS

Emily Morrow Featured in Atlanta Magazine November 2001 The Judd House owned by Evelyn Myers and the Myers Family.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As I look back on my career path, I am grateful to the incredible women who so generously opened doors and encouraged me to go further and do do better. One such women was Evelyn Myers. In 2001 I had moved back to my hometown of Dalton from Carrollton, Georgia where I’d practiced interior design for 12 years. Although I was known in Dalton as Emily Kiker, I was not known by most as Emily Morrow, the interior designer. I did however know Mrs. Myers through my own mother and in some of our exchanges, she shared some of her upcoming “design-related” endeavors. It was that same year, 2001, Evelyn Myers invited me to be a guest designer in her “Judd House Designer Showhouse”, which would provide valuable networking opportunities with our local community, other designers and architects. If not for her invitation, I might not have had the change to meet the many contacts who later became my colleagues and bosses at Shaw Industries.

The February March 2020 issue of Hardwood Floors celebrates the talented and dynamic women in our industry who have gone before us and worked amongst us. They smoothed the path, opened doors, and showed other women the way forward. I am so inspired by these women and would not be where I am today without their wisdom and guidance. Looking back on the lessons I’ve learned, and taking stock of how many influential and passionate women have inspired me never to stop growing, I hope what I do today will inspire others in the same way. While my career has gone through a series of changes, I know my journey would not have been possible with the support given to me by women in the industry.

THE VITAL ROLE OF WOMEN IN FLOOR COVERING

I’m fortunate to have a unique perspective on the power of women in flooring history, starting at a very early age. Growing up in Dalton, Georgia, I’ve witnessed generation after generation of women entrepreneurs acting as trailblazers and role models. If you’re familiar with the history of carpet, you’ll know it all started in Dalton along “Peacock Alley” with the crafting of hand-tufted chenille bedspreads, an industry started by extraordinary women like Dicksie Bradley Bandy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During the great depression, Dicksie and her husband’s country store had given credit to their customers who had no money to pay for the goods they needed, only their possessions, what they could make or grow themselves. The country store eventually became indebted to their suppliers and although there was no way to recoup the money from their customers, Dicksie and her husband were determined to repay every dollar. Determined to find a way to raise the funds, she boarded a train to Washington, D.C., carrying a suitcase filled with hand-tufted chenille bedspreads to sell to large department stores. She came home with enough money to repay her suppliers AND with enough orders to give several families an income for their craft. That simple cottage industry grew and evolved to the point where Dalton is now known not just the “carpet capital” but as the “floor covering capital of the world”. 

In this industry, not only are many of my peers women, but the majority of our customers are as well. We speak of “Ms. Consumer” as making more than 91% of the purchasing decisions for the home. With the purchasing power of women in the United States ranging from $5 trillion annually, we certainly MUST consider “her” in our business decisions, and we certainly MUST consult women on what goes into a new product launch. 

LESSONS IN RESILIENCE AND PAYING DUES

Looking back, some of my early jobs were excruciating. One example was working for a family-owned women’s wear manufacturer whose owners would inadvertently exhale their cigarette smoke into my eyes causing me to leave work many days in tears. At the same time, they also gave me the chance to work with fabrics, color-ways, and the people that would be selling the apparel across the U.S. That experience was priceless. Soon I found myself training sales persons about the designs and colors of the coming collections.

Along the way, I learned about perseverance, resilience and the importance of hard work – even when it it seemed at the time like I was being pulled in the wrong direction. Balancing competing priorities had been modeled by my mother, a fantastic entrepreneur in her own right. As I began my own journey into motherhood as an interior designer, I carried with me the power of the examples and lessons that only magnified in importance over time. 

While I loved the work I was doing, after the arrival of my firstborn William, I was inspired to take a huge leap. The result was that my own interior design business was born. It was the culmination of all that I had learned and experienced up until then – and just when I thought I had it all “balanced” along comes Mary. Juggling motherhood to two small children with an interior design business taught me how to put first things first. My first design business operated in the West Georgia area for nearly 12 years, doing both commercial and residential design projects. 

Those years allowed me the experience of putting family first. It’s a lesson I’ve tried to live by since. I learned to be a mother first and foremost, and I had the flexibility and freedom to schedule design appointments around the schedules of babysitters, mothers’ mornings out, and my children’s own evolving schedules. 

ANSWERING THE OPPORTUNITY

The women in my life have taught me so many powerful lessons that I try to pass on to those who I have had the good fortune of knowing. One of the most important things I was taught is that like doors, opportunities can open and close quickly. Recognizing the opportunities requires a certain kind of “sixth sense” to know when to take them. Unfortunately, too often opportunities can seem daunting and present themselves as “risk”.

This lesson became a huge blessing as I faced a professional crossroads in 2002. Having just become a single mother, and after operating my own interior design business for many years, I was encouraged to move into the corporate world to provide the benefits my children and I would need. While there was some risk involved (would I be able to work the corporate hours? What if my kids needed me? How could I juggle my children’s activities with my travel schedule?…and much more) it was a leap that I was well-prepared to take for my family. 

So when asked if I could direct a large group of corporate professionals and juggle continually changing business priorities, I actually laughed out loud. That had become second nature to me. For years, at any given time, I had teams of painters, carpenters, flooring installers or other tradespeople going in and out of the businesses and homes of my clients, on time and budget, all while being a mother of two. Speaking of juggling priorities, one very important project, a medical arts building was being installed the very day I was in labor with the birth of my daughter. Needless to say, both “projects” demanded my attention that day but in the end, my family was only thing that truly mattered.

THE IMPORTANCE OF FAMILY

I hope that my experience demonstrates to other women – and men – in the industry that you can prioritize family and still have an enriching and successful career. That is perhaps the most important lesson of all, and one I hope to be remembered for, the same way I remember all of the incredible wisdom and support that was shared with me.

I encourage all of us to prioritize family and to allow everything else to fall into place. Following my own advice, I opted to leave a life of constant travel while working for a massive company, to instead revel in family. I chose to instead take a moment to savor my time being a new wife, a mother, and an empty nester.

When the time was right, I again took another risk, following my instinct, and formed a new enterprise, one that would eventually become relevant to husband’s own company. Who encouraged me to take that step? It was the same woman who inspired me nearly thirty years prior, my mother.

 

 

 

 

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Part I: How to host a wedding at your home…(and other special events)

Part I: How to host a wedding at your home…(and other special events)

THE TOP 5 CONSIDERATIONS BEFORE YOU COMMIT TO A HOME WEDDING:

    1. ASK THE BRIDE ABOUT WHAT SHE WANT THE SPECIAL DAY TO FEEL LIKE
    2. WHAT TIME OF YEAR WILL IT BE?
    3. WILL THE WEDDING DATE PERMIT AN OUTDOOR CEREMONY AND RECEPTION?
    4. WHAT IS THE AGE SPREAD OF YOUR GUESTS?
    5. GIVE PRIORITY TO THE GRANDPARENTS SINCE THEY’RE NOT ONLY CHERISHED GUESTS BUT ALSO THE MOST VULNERABLE.
She said yes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to a brand new year in which we hope with all our heart that only the best will happen. One thing to remember, regardless of geo-political events or pandemics that are going viral, “Love overcomes a lot of things”, even COVID-19. Last spring, my son William Morrow was planning his proposal to Ashley Walker, his girlfriend. I have never been more proud of my son than I was last year…starting with his choice of his wife, someone we all loved and who shares his same convictions and beliefs about life, and secondly with his ability to roll with all of the changes that were to come. Last year, 2020 basically required everyone to be or become adaptable, and those who were the most adaptable seemed to handle the obstacles the best. That the bride-to-be and groom-to-be were both being optimists certainly did help as William and Ashley made and readjusted their plans for their engagement, their parties, the wedding weekend and even their honeymoon. Their smiles said it all, they were in love and nothing was going to get in their way to have a happy engagement and wedding. Our friends who hosted their engagement party wisely agreed that it might turn out to be their only party and rolled out the literal red carpet as only Daltonians do. The engagement party became a couples shower, and took place at a friend’s stunning open air barn, with live entertainment and a large fire. It was the perfect place to celebrate their engagement!

The cutest un-invitations

 

 

 

Their smiles said it all!

 

 

 

 

Almost all mothers of the grooms can agree that it’s a little different when it’s your son who’s getting married and you’re not in control of the event, but Ashley and her mother were the epitome of graciousness throughout it all. As we watched and waited from mid-May to September, it became abundantly clear that the state of Georgia restrictions were not going to be lifted for public events such as weddings to allow beyond 50 persons within a banquet space. The beautiful blush-colored wedding invitations that Ashley and William had mailed out were now requiring another new genre of invitations, an un-invitation. The first step for the two love birds was to go back and painstakingly narrowing down the guests to the immediate family and their wedding party, and then send out “un-invitations”. Ashley and I found some cute “un-invitations” on zazzle.com and within an hour they were designed and ready to order.

 

 

We wanted to have a cross for our home and one of my happiest days was when Don and I made this one ourselves!

 

 

Our back porch is one of our family’s most favorite places. While having to stay home during the shutdown of 2020, we named our porch “Nature’s Sanctuary”…and why not? We attended “online church” and watched the birds, deer, fox, and all the other kinds of wildlife go right by us as we sip our coffee or have dinner al fresco together. Also on the back porch is Donatella the Truffle dog who reigns as queen of the porch and entire back yard. It should come as no surprise that our family was sitting on our porch after dinner one evening when William said he and Ashley said they thought it might be kind of cool to have the wedding right there in our back yard around the pool. The Covid-19 restrictions were severely limiting their wedding venue options and they were not wanting to change their original wedding date of November 7th. We got really excited about the idea of having such a special moment in our lives right there in our “nature’s sanctuary” and I drafted a short list of to-do’s (a list that grew and grew). Personally speaking, my biggest priority was to elevate our back yard to the event, rather than have the wedding feel like a “back yard barbecue”. Although we love back yard barbecues, this sweet little bride simply wanted the wedding to feel like a wedding, and we didn’t blame her one bit. That meant getting a few things spruced up. Do you know what happens when you start to fix one little thing? It turns into something bigger you didn’t expect and this was no exception.

 

Trees and shrubbery had to be severely pruned to make way for an outdoor pathway to the back yard, in an effort to keep everyone outdoors. Pathway lighting had been installed last year thankfully, and so we only needed to add mesh and orb lights for effect.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have I mentioned we love our back porch? Being southern and living in the south like we do, we spend a large part of our lives on the porch. When the coronavirus swept across the nation and our constant traveling came to a screeching halt, we gleefully parked ourselves on the back porch, loaded up the bird feeders with seed and quarantined ourselves while watching the birds and the bees. From time to time, I’d casually mention seeing these little “winged things” take flight from our back porch and asked my husband what they were, then we’d see a pretty bird fly by and forget all about them. Fast forward to September 5th when we discovered that they were something that no one wants to see, carpenter ants! Our house siding is made of hardy-board *except for the soffit and facia which now it appears needs to be urgently replaced, which requires also new gutters and painting it all back to match. Hmmm okay, the house was built in the early 2000’s and I had been waiting for just the right time to paint it in a new color palette. It’s worth noting that my family is in the commercial construction business…they do not do residential construction, they do not do renovations BUT I called the cavalry and they showed up with their best help and sub-contractors! My family is beyond special in how we show up for each other in times of need, and this was certainly a time of urgent need. Project “Fixer Upper” for the wedding started on our back porch. We became tuned in to the subtle nuances of the men, their various coffee preferences and watched with awe at how quickly they could eradicate our home of carpenter ants, replace the gutters and paint it ~ almost as if it never happened but better. *Paint colors provided upon request. For their skill, strength, and determination to get us ready for William and Ashley’s wedding I will always be grateful.

This is mid-way through repainting, it’s already looking so different as a white house instead of a gray house.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The most important considerations for a pandemic wedding are to keep yourself and your guests “safe” which meant having masks, hand sanitizer and praying for the weather to be perfect so that everyone could be outside. We had grandparents to consider and wanted to be sure while they were included in the wedding plans while not exposing them to the virus. God is so good and a strange thing happened, my son “the groom” and his groomsmen (almost all 13) contracted the coronavirus on their bacherlor’s golf weekend and brought it home to their significant others which included the bride to be…we began checking calendars at this moment while everyone is sending text messages that they’d tested positive, I noted that we had a little over two weeks for everyone to quarantine, get well (and pray that no one else got it). We ordered the cutest masks for the special day, also at Zazzle.com, which coordinated with the custom designed dinner napkins, the fall foliage and crimson florals in the bridal bouquet ~ details matter ~ even masks. We ordered enough masks for the rehearsal dinner AND the wedding. We weren’t taking any chances with contagiousness.

 

Masks can be cute and customized for events like a rehearsal dinner or a wedding. We love the ones we ordered from Zazzle.com.

All of these photos are our own, but you’ll see more to come from the wedding photographer Mackenzie Alexa photography in the next blog post. I can’t wait to share the next chapter of getting ready for the wedding when I can share some of the stunning videography of Kyle Delk. Some of his footage brought tears to my eyes of reliving the weekend one more time in “slow motion”. Here’s a sneak preview so you’ll know what I mean when I say “stunning”!

Stay tuned for Part II “How to host a wedding at home”.

Cheers!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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COVID-19 and the Future of Interior Design

COVID-19 and the Future of Interior Design

The design business relies heavily on interpersonal connections between clients and designers. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, I’ve been keeping my finger on the pulse with peers via Zoom and teleconference.
Just as creative as designers are with color, styling, and interior architecture, we also can be just as innovative with how we conduct our business. Technology has been key to allowing us to do our jobs.

During a recent Emily Morrow Home Designer Pro-Gram Zoom discussion, one design team in Chicago explained how they were able to use FaceTime to “walk” their clients through the Chicago Merchandise Mart to show them looks they were recommending for their project. I asked how they were able to express the quality or texture or value of the products they’re selecting when the end-user can’t hold or feel it in person. Their response to me was that trust played an important role. That answer shouldn’t surprise anyone who understands the relationship and trust between design pro and client.

TRUST AND TRUE VALUE

Trust is at the heart of a great design project, as well as a design professional’s reputation. A client must trust a designer when it comes time to spend more on a particular visual or finish. Providing samples has long been a necessity to assure clients they were spending more money to get something more substantial. Sometimes it is “exclusive” or sometimes it’s a much better product, either by touch or weight. Because design consultation is considered a discretionary item, in today’s turbulent times, more and more designers are having to justify their work and price their services in ways that don’t seem to exceed the value they are bringing to their clients. More than that, designers are being asked important questions about the “why” behind their choices. Now more than ever before, designers are also being pressured to provide products that are “better” in terms of how and where they are made. As such, designers are working closely with retailers to learn the facts about where a product was made and by whom. Designers understand they have to have peace of mind that once installed, there won’t be pushback.

Because product knowledge is so important, sales associates must be ready to speak openly, easily, and with confidence about products. Designers are asking all of the right questions and providing solutions to their clients. One thing in particular that designers do best, both in commercial and residential design, is to put the human needs first. Today, consumers are demanding to know what each product contains.

OTHER CONSEQUENCES OF THE COVID-19 LOCKDOWN

Homeowners were quarantining at home and seeing the various cracks, chips, and fading materials that they cannot wait to replace or update. Flooring is no exception. We saw an immediate uptick in online sample orders during the first weeks of the COVID-19 quarantine. The idea that homeowners would be interested in home improvement after spending unprecedented time at home seems obvious in retrospect, as does the color and design trends that are now gaining traction. There is currently a desire for calming and soothing color palettes, as well as bringing cheer into a space. Blues, squad, greens, and warming earth-tones are all trending upwards. Beyond comforting and soothing color palettes, there is also a desire for bringing health and nature into interior spaces. One way to bring the health and nature themes into the home is through the use of natural materials, such as hardwood flooring that is light, matte, and has cleaner grain. Trends indicate this style of flooring will outsell dark or muted wood floors. Floors that are plasticized, still will have their place in the market, but in a head-to-head comparison for a quality custom built home, hardwood floors will take first place. If it looks and feels close to nature, it is going to be an easier sell to homeowners than the plastic-looking materials. From a broader trend perspective, healthy homes are homes that you would consider luxurious and beautiful. I fully expect that healthy homes, even if located in urban areas, will include hardwood as a primary building material.

Because product knowledge is so important, sales associates must be ready to speak openly, easily, and with confidence about products. Designers are asking all of the right questions and providing solutions to their clients. One thing in particular that designers do best, both in commercial and residential design, is to put the human needs first. Today, consumers are demanding to know what each product contains.

HOME IS THE NEW WORKPLACE

One final trend we are seeing during the past few months is that working remotely is the new corporate norm. This provides numerous opportunities for us as flooring providers and interior designers. We must help homeowners define spaces within their home more definitively. There is the resting “oasis” space and the “work” space. If homes are now our sanctuary from the work world and our work worlds are now within our sanctuaries, what shifts are going to happen as a result? We also expect to see more merging of commercial and residentially styled products that perform under the pressure of daily wear and tear. Commutes are now taking place just across the kitchen or just across the hallway from the bedroom. With the merging of spaces, we will see an uptick in the quality of the finishes being used. If you’re now spending longer days at home working, designers and homeowners are trending strongly already toward a preference for anything that lasts longer and looks good longer.

 

 

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Emily Morrow Home | NWFA and FCW | Adapting to Changing Demands

Adapting to changing demands as featured in Floor Covering Weekly
Monday, May 4, 2020
By Morgan Bulman

[Chesterfield, Mo.] The COVID-19 pandemic isn’t the only disruptive challenge the hardwood floor industry has faced. For the second day of the NWFA’s first-ever virtual Expo, a session tag-teamed by Emily Morrow Home CEO Emily Morrow Finkell and Anderson Tuftex’s director of brand strategy Katie Ford outlined how to stay steady with wood in an unpredictable marketplace.

Define your business
“Our industry is continually being disrupted,” shared Morrow Finkell during the online webinar. “We have to accept that change is constant and that it really is up to us to adapt and evolve.”

Some of the biggest complaints listed by Morrow Finkell included internet sales, fake wood, cheap imports and the uncertainty of a post-coronavirus retail market.

“Ask yourself some tough questions: What is unique to your business? Who are you hoping will buy your products? Do you know how others see you? What types of products best fit your business and your customers?” she posed, while offering listeners to review and define their value disposition.

Elevate wood’s qualities
Authenticity as a business is key, especially in order to sell an authentic product. Morrow Finkell revealed one of the most important qualities of wood is its natural authenticity, especially considering the current wellness culture consumers are living in, particularly in light of COVID-19.

And although industry professionals have a tendency to get hung up on who to sell to, whether its Baby Boomers or Millennials, “the wellness initiative is huge for every one of these demographics and will continue to expand,” she said.

In fact, Morrow Finkell referred to the Global Wellness Institute, which reported “health and wellness” is now a 4.5 trillion-dollar market and that 134 billion of that amount is devoted to holistic-oriented real estate. This can include anything from available exercise equipment to sustainable building materials like flooring.

“Designers almost always advise their clients to go with natural materials, nine times out of 10,” she noted. Wood has always been the top, coveted flooring visual, but as the market becomes oversaturated with lookalikes, Morrow Finkell believes there’s untapped potential in offering premium, high quality products consumers are starved for.

“Wood is synonymous with wellness,” she stressed.

“Hardwood is truly timeless,” but a great way to stay on top of changing market demands is to keep tabs on what customers are looking for. And, right now, there are three aspects to keep tabs on:

1. Light and neutral colors: Plaster, jute, wool, linen and muslin – this is what has inspired the light and ultra-matte colors of Emily Morrow Home. “Organic is a huge buzz word,” shared Morrow Finkell. Natural, organic and plaster-inspired color palettes are trending.
2. Dark statement stains: Interiors in general are trending light – white cabinetry, light fixtures, fabrics. For these home choices, dark woods offer a great deal of contrast, revealed Morrow Finkell.
3. Premium cuts and graining: When it comes to wood, quality sells well. “If you have a premium brand, you need to have a premium sample experience,”. To receive free samples of Emily Morrow Home Hardwood, simply text EMILY2 to 900900.

 

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HAPPY EARTH DAY 2020!

HAPPY EARTH DAY 2020!

The sunrises and sunsets in Kenya and Tanzania were beyond description. This particular one was a view of the river where we saw so many hippos and crocodiles.

Celebrating EARTH DAY while working from home has been interesting. Typically Earth Day would be one of those days we are running in circles… just wishing we could be home, or be outside…and today, you guessed it, we have all that and more! I’ve enjoyed being able to stay home without any worry that I’m somehow letting someone down, not being somewhere that I’m supposed to be, and it goes without saying our dog Donatella is LOVING it! While we have been quarantined in our little Rocky Face abode, I have been able to drive to my office in Dalton since literally no one is there. It’s quiet for writing articles for NWFA magazine, EMH blog posts, plan virtual cocktail party for designers, host an occasional webinar, take an order or check on the status of orders at the plant. Now more than ever I’ve come to fully appreciate the fact that Emily Morrow Home is a “boutique” brand and company. I’ve been fortunate enough to stay “hands on” with a majority of the marketing because I know exactly what I want…based on all the conversations and discussions over the years with friends like you.

One “quarantine-achievement” in particular that I’m beyond proud of is the launch of the Emily Morrow Designer Pro-gram. It took a quiet mind to lay out the program in a way that enhances everyone’s enterprises, flooring retailers (check), distributors (check), decorators (check), designers (check), retail sales and design associates (check)…and the launch party is next week. Don’t worry, it’s a virtual cocktail party and thus far with have just around 100 RSVP’s who will be joining us. By the way, let me know if YOU or you know of someone you’d like me to invite, the more the merrier!

On Earth Days of the past we celebrated nature in all its glory and (think about this) we had zero worries IF we hugged a person. On this 2020 Corona-virus-impacted Earth Day, I celebrate the earth and nature FIRST, but I also pause to feel grateful for Apple’s MacBook Pro, iPad and iPhones since without those tools, I wouldn’t be able to stay so well connected with YOU. I’m a hugger…and I think this pandemic might just make me think twice about hugging…but meanwhile, I’m still sending “air hugs”.

If you’d like additional reading material check out NWFA’s April May 2020 Issue just released and my article is linked here for the  TRENDS of the NEW DECADE.

Enjoy Earth day ~  let me know HOW you and yours are celebrating!

Cheers!


This is just a glimpse into some of what we’ve been up to…sending out EMH hardwood samples, loading up EMH Cares Quarantine Packages and much more…all from our dining room table or back porch….and OH by the way, I found a missing memory card from my Nikon camera which was FULL of more amazing photos from our Safari in 2018. Some are below.

Elephants in the sunset, taken by Emily Morrow Finkell August 2018 in Kenya.
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Donatella the Truffle Dog will send you 2 free “puppy-size” EMH hardwood samples when you text ‘EMILY2’ to 900900

Donatella the Truffle Dog and I are offering a little extra help as we all work to get through the next few weeks of living in a world where quarantining is the best and smartest option. With our digital marketing capabilities we can easily process hundreds of requests for small hardwood samples in any given time without you having to trouble yourself. Once we send out confirmation that the sample order is going out, we provide the ‘nearest retailer’ information, give hardwood flooring and on occasion answer design-related questions…all of which I believe helps close the sale for you.

Feel free to use our COUPON CODE of “EMILY2” with your sales associates, your designers or any customers that you think can benefit from this service.

Simply text “EMILY2” to 900900 and we’ll take it from there!

Meanwhile, please feel free to read through the following, our installation instructions, our wonderful product warranty which includes a little more information about OMG Proof Protection.

 

Emily Morrow Home Installation Instructions

Emily-Morrow-Home-Warranty-OMG-PROOF

How to care for your Emily Morrow Home Hardwood floors

 

Thank you!!!

 

 

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While Quarantined…Where do you go to find inspiration for your designs?

A serengeti sunset is beautiful until you figure out that in the distance is a burning prairie in Kenya, photo credits – Emily Morrow Finkell August, 2019.

When asked recently by a member of the press, “Where are you finding creative inspiration during the quarantine?”…and my first thought was that there really wasn’t a creative moment in this whole adventure of staying at home. Then it dawned on me…I had been going back through photos of our treks, clearing out memory cards from my camera and one in particular was from our 2018 trip to Kenya. As any good photographer would do, I didn’t immediately “delete all” but instead “viewed all”…and am “keeping almost all” of the images. So many of the photographs are astonishingly beautiful, causing me to ask myself “how in the world did I miss this one?”. You know how it is when you first get home from a trip, there’s a rush of activity, the usual stuff you have to do when you’ve been out of pocket, and for us, when we got home from Kenya we moved right into product development of the new Emily Morrow Home hardwood styles, all of which were inspired by our travels, many of which were the Safari, and then we ran right into winter market. Quite honestly I never really got a chance to sit down and absorb all the photos I had taken, only a few of the ones that fit the story line of my products. Now that time has elapsed, and now that I have some spare time to do this, I’m amazed at the phenomenal images that have managed to go unseen until this week when I found them, they are treasures. One of my favorites is this shot. I just love the textures, the mix of colors, the contrast of the gorgeous sunset and the threat of danger from the fires. It’s amazing how immediately one image can call to mind such a rich blend of sights, the smells, the sensations in my memory banks. Once again, I am so inspired!

 

Enjoy the journey!

Emily

P.S. Share your favorite travel photos with me at emily@emilymorrowhome.com

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Emily Morrow Finkell for NWFA | WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS 

Emily Morrow Finkell for Hardwood Floors Magazine NWFA | WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS 

The February March 2020 issue of Hardwood Floors celebrates the talented and dynamic women in our industry who have gone before us and worked amongst us. They smoothed the path, opened doors, and showed other women the way forward. I am so inspired by these women and would not be where I am today without their wisdom and guidance. Looking back on the lessons I’ve learned, and taking stock of how many influential and passionate women have inspired me never to stop growing, I hope what I do today will inspire others in the same way. While my career has gone through a series of changes, I know my journey would not have been possible with the support given to me by women in the industry.

THE VITAL ROLE OF WOMEN IN FLOOR COVERING

I’m fortunate to have a unique perspective on the power of women in flooring history, starting at a very early age. Growing up in Dalton, Georgia, I’ve witnessed generation after generation of women entrepreneurs acting as trailblazers and role models. If you’re familiar with the history of carpet, you’ll know it all started in Dalton along “Peacock Alley” with the crafting of hand-tufted chenille bedspreads, an industry started by extraordinary women like Dicksie Bradley Bandy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

During the great depression, Dicksie and her husband’s country store had given credit to their customers who had no money to pay for the goods they needed, only their possessions, what they could make or grow themselves. The country store eventually became indebted to their suppliers and although there was no way to recoup the money from their customers, Dicksie and her husband were determined to repay every dollar. Determined to find a way to raise the funds, she boarded a train to Washington, D.C., carrying a suitcase filled with hand-tufted chenille bedspreads to sell to large department stores. She came home with enough money to repay her suppliers AND with enough orders to give several families an income for their craft. That simple cottage industry grew and evolved to the point where Dalton is now known not just the “carpet capital” but as the “floor covering capital of the world”. 

In this industry, not only are many of my peers women, but the majority of our customers are as well. We speak of “Ms. Consumer” as making more than 91% of the purchasing decisions for the home. With the purchasing power of women in the United States ranging from $5 trillion annually, we certainly MUST consider “her” in our business decisions, and we certainly MUST consult women on what goes into a new product launch. 

WOMEN INSPIRING OTHERS

As I look back on my career path, I am grateful to the incredible women who so generously opened doors and encouraged me to go further and do do better. One such women was Evelyn Myers. In 2001 I had moved back to my hometown of Dalton from Carrollton, Georgia where I’d practiced interior design for 12 years. Although I was known in Dalton as Emily Kiker, I was not known by most as Emily Morrow, the interior designer. I did however know Mrs. Myers through my own mother and in some of our exchanges, she shared some of her upcoming “design-related” endeavors. It was that same year, 2001, Evelyn Myers invited me to be a guest designer in her “Judd House Designer Showhouse”, which would provide valuable networking opportunities with our local community, other designers and architects. If not for her invitation, I might not have had the change to meet the many contacts who later became my colleagues and bosses at Shaw Industries. 

Emily Morrow Featured in Atlanta Magazine November 2001 The Judd House owned by Evelyn Myers and the Myers Family.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LESSONS IN RESILIENCE AND PAYING DUES

Looking back, some of my early jobs were excruciating. One example was working for a family-owned women’s wear manufacturer whose owners would inadvertently exhale their cigarette smoke into my eyes causing me to leave work many days in tears. At the same time, they also gave me the chance to work with fabrics, color-ways, and the people that would be selling the apparel across the U.S. That experience was priceless. Soon I found myself training sales persons about the designs and colors of the coming collections.

Along the way, I learned about perseverance, resilience and the importance of hard work – even when it it seemed at the time like I was being pulled in the wrong direction. Balancing competing priorities had been modeled by my mother, a fantastic entrepreneur in her own right. As I began my own journey into motherhood as an interior designer, I carried with me the power of the examples and lessons that only magnified in importance over time. 

While I loved the work I was doing, after the arrival of my firstborn William, I was inspired to take a huge leap. The result was that my own interior design business was born. It was the culmination of all that I had learned and experienced up until then – and just when I thought I had it all “balanced” along comes Mary. Juggling motherhood to two small children with an interior design business taught me how to put first things first. My first design business operated in the West Georgia area for nearly 12 years, doing both commercial and residential design projects. 

Those years allowed me the experience of putting family first. It’s a lesson I’ve tried to live by since. I learned to be a mother first and foremost, and I had the flexibility and freedom to schedule design appointments around the schedules of babysitters, mothers’ mornings out, and my children’s own evolving schedules. 

ANSWERING THE OPPORTUNITY

The women in my life have taught me so many powerful lessons that I try to pass on to those who I have had the good fortune of knowing. One of the most important things I was taught is that like doors, opportunities can open and close quickly. Recognizing the opportunities requires a certain kind of “sixth sense” to know when to take them. Unfortunately, too often opportunities can seem daunting and present themselves as “risk”.

This lesson became a huge blessing as I faced a professional crossroads in 2002. Having just become a single mother, and after operating my own interior design business for many years, I was encouraged to move into the corporate world to provide the benefits my children and I would need. While there was some risk involved (would I be able to work the corporate hours? What if my kids needed me? How could I juggle my children’s activities with my travel schedule?…and much more) it was a leap that I was well-prepared to take for my family. 

So when asked if I could direct a large group of corporate professionals and juggle continually changing business priorities, I actually laughed out loud. That had become second nature to me. For years, at any given time, I had teams of painters, carpenters, flooring installers or other tradespeople going in and out of the businesses and homes of my clients, on time and budget, all while being a mother of two. Speaking of juggling priorities, one very important project, a medical arts building was being installed the very day I was in labor with the birth of my daughter. Needless to say, both “projects” demanded my attention that day but in the end, my family was only thing that truly mattered.

THE IMPORTANCE OF FAMILY

I hope that my experience demonstrates to other women – and men – in the industry that you can prioritize family and still have an enriching and successful career. That is perhaps the most important lesson of all, and one I hope to be remembered for, the same way I remember all of the incredible wisdom and support that was shared with me.

I encourage all of us to prioritize family and to allow everything else to fall into place. Following my own advice, I opted to leave a life of constant travel while working for a massive company, to instead revel in family. I chose to instead take a moment to savor my time being a new wife, a mother, and an empty nester.

When the time was right, I again took another risk, following my instinct, and formed a new enterprise, one that would eventually become relevant to husband’s own company. Who encouraged me to take that step? It was the same woman who inspired me nearly thirty years prior, my mother.

 

 

 

 

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Domotex USA 2020 | Emily Morrow Home hosting Design Personified Lunch & Learn for Designers & Retailers

Don’t miss this special ticketed event

Design Personified | Turning Trends into Reality

Feb. 6, 2020 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM 


Emily Morrow Home is hosting the 3rd annual EMH Design Panel and  the 2nd annual Designer event at Domotex USA, February 6th, 2020.

Having an understanding of today’s trends is extremely important when helping customers with their décor choices. However, many of these “trends” can seem unrealistic to a consumer who is living in a dated home. They want to incorporate the latest looks into their décor but feel it is impossible without undergoing a major renovation.

By attending the Designer Personified panel discussion, you will learn how to tackle this challenge and more. Attendees will hear from leading designers as they share the latest design trends, discuss the difference between “trends” and “trendy,” and teach valuable “tricks of the trade,” you can use to help customers realistically incorporate fresh, lasting looks they love.

Pricing

  • $55 through Dec. 17
  • $65 Dec. 18 Feb. 4
  • $75 onsite

Space is limited.

REGISTER

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Emily Morrow Finkell 

CEO and Founder of Emily Morrow Home

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Jane Dagmi

Designers Today
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Michel Smith Boyd

Michel Smith Boyd Interiors
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Pacita Wilson

Pineapple Park
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Jenny Wagner

J. Thomas Designs
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Mark Woodman

Mark Woodman Design + Color, LLC
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Domotex USA 2020 | Emily Morrow Home to host Design Personified: Behind-the-Scenes Mill Tour

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